Ar n t I a Woman

Ar n t I a Woman
Author: Deborah Gray White
Release: 1985
Editor: W. W. Norton
Pages: 216
ISBN: 039330406X
Language: en
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Exploration of the assumed roles within families and the community and the burdens placed on slave women.

Ar n t I A Woman

Ar n t I A Woman
Author: Deborah Gray White
Release: 1985
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 329
ISBN: OCLC:650283773
Language: en
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Ar n t I a Woman

Ar n t I a Woman
Author: Deborah Gray White
Release: 1999
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Pages: 244
ISBN: 0393314812
Language: en
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Explores the contributions made by enslaved women to the family's economy and suggests they achieved a greater degree of equality with their men than white women

Ar n t I a Woman Female Slaves in the Plantation South Revised Edition

Ar n t I a Woman   Female Slaves in the Plantation South  Revised Edition
Author: Deborah Gray White
Release: 1999-02-17
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780393343526
Language: en
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"This is one of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field. Professor White has done justice to the complexity of her subject."—Anne Firor Scott, Duke University Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society. This new edition of Ar'n't I a Woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives. Above all, this groundbreaking study shows us how black women experienced freedom in the Reconstruction South — their heroic struggle to gain their rights, hold their families together, resist economic and sexual oppression, and maintain their sense of womanhood against all odds.

Ain t I A Woman

Ain t I A Woman
Author: Sojourner Truth
Release: 2020-09-24
Editor: Penguin UK
Pages: 112
ISBN: 9780241472378
Language: en
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'I am a woman's rights. I have plowed and reaped and husked and chopped and mowed, and can any man do more than that? I am as strong as any man that is now' A former slave and one of the most powerful orators of her time, Sojourner Truth fought for the equal rights of Black women throughout her life. This selection of her impassioned speeches is accompanied by the words of other inspiring African-American female campaigners from the nineteenth century. One of twenty new books in the bestselling Penguin Great Ideas series. This new selection showcases a diverse list of thinkers who have helped shape our world today, from anarchists to stoics, feminists to prophets, satirists to Zen Buddhists.

Sojourner Truth A Life A Symbol

Sojourner Truth  A Life  A Symbol
Author: Nell Irvin Painter
Release: 1997-10-17
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9780393635669
Language: en
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A monumental biography of one of the most important black women of the nineteenth century. Sojourner Truth first gained prominence at an 1851 Akron, Ohio, women's rights conference, saying, "Dat man over dar say dat woman needs to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches. . . . Nobody eber helps me into carriages, or ober mud-puddles . . . and ar'n't I a woman?" Sojourner Truth: ex-slave and fiery abolitionist, figure of imposing physique, riveting preacher and spellbinding singer who dazzled listeners with her wit and originality. Straight-talking and unsentimental, Truth became a national symbol for strong black women--indeed, for all strong women. Like Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass, she is regarded as a radical of immense and enduring influence; yet, unlike them, what is remembered of her consists more of myth than of personality. Now, in a masterful blend of scholarship and sympathetic understanding, eminent black historian Nell Irvin Painter goes beyond the myths, words, and photographs to uncover the life of a complex woman who was born into slavery and died a legend. Inspired by religion, Truth transformed herself from a domestic servant named Isabella into an itinerant pentecostal preacher; her words of empowerment have inspired black women and poor people the world over to this day. As an abolitionist and a feminist, Truth defied the notion that slaves were male and women were white, expounding a fact that still bears repeating: among blacks there are women; among women, there are blacks. No one who heard her speak ever forgot Sojourner Truth, the power and pathos of her voice, and the intelligence of her message. No one who reads Painter's groundbreaking biography will forget this landmark figure and the story of her courageous life.

The Plantation Mistress

The Plantation Mistress
Author: Catherine Clinton
Release: 1982
Editor: Pantheon
Pages: 331
ISBN: 9780394722535
Language: en
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Examines the place of women in the daily life of the Southern plantations before the Civil War and analyzes the women's relationship with slaves and their masters

Too Heavy a Load

Too Heavy a Load
Author: Deborah Gray White
Release: 1999
Editor: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
Pages: 320
ISBN: 0393046672
Language: en
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Chronicles one hundred years in the struggle of African-American women to attain equality and to establish a resistance to persistent racism, male chauvinism, and negative sterotyping, assessing black women's role in the battle for civil rights and women's rights.

Ar N t I A Woman

Ar N t I A Woman
Author: Deborah Gray White
Release: 1999
Editor: Peter Smith Publisher
Pages: 244
ISBN: 0844670227
Language: en
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Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society. This new edition of Ar'n't I a Woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives. Above all, this groundbreaking study shows us how black women experienced freedom in the Reconstruction South -- their heroic struggle to gain their rights, hold their families together, resist economic and sexual oppression, and maintain their sense of womanhood against all odds.

Ain t I a Woman

Ain t I a Woman
Author: Bell Hooks,The South End Press Collective
Release: 2007-09-01
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 220
ISBN: 0896087697
Language: en
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" Ain't I a Woman : Black Women and Feminism is among America's most influential works. Prolific, outspoken, and fearless."- The Village Voice  "This book is a classic. It . . . should be read by anyone who takes feminism seriously."- Sojourner  "[ Ain't I a Woman ] should be widely read, thoughtfully considered, discussed, and finally acclaimed for the real enlightenment it offers for social change."- Library Journal  "One of the twenty most influential women's books of the last twenty years."- Publishers Weekly  "I met a young sister who was a feminist, and she gave me a book called Ain't I a Woman by a talented, beautiful sister named bell hooks-and it changed my life. It changed my whole perspective of myself as a woman."-Jada Pinkett-Smith  At nineteen, bell hooks began writing the book that forever changed the course of feminist thought. Ain't I a Woman remains a classic analysis of the impact of sexism on black women during slavery, the historic devaluation of black womanhood, black male sexism, racism within the women's movement, and black women's involvement with feminism.  bell hooks is the author of numerous critically acclaimed and influential books on the politics of race, gender, class, and culture. The Atlantic Monthly celebrates her as one of our nation's leading public intellectuals .

Telling Histories

Telling Histories
Author: Deborah Gray White
Release: 2009-11-30
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Pages: 304
ISBN: 0807889121
Language: en
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The field of black women's history gained recognition as a legitimate field of study only late in the twentieth century. Collecting stories that are both deeply personal and powerfully political, Telling Histories compiles seventeen personal narratives by leading black women historians at various stages in their careers. Their essays illuminate how--first as graduate students and then as professional historians--they entered and navigated the realm of higher education, a world concerned with and dominated by whites and men. In distinct voices and from different vantage points, the personal histories revealed here also tell the story of the struggle to establish a new scholarly field. Black women, alleged by affirmative-action supporters and opponents to be "twofers," recount how they have confronted racism, sexism, and homophobia on college campuses. They explore how the personal and the political intersect in historical research and writing and in the academy. Organized by the years the contributors earned their Ph.D.'s, these essays follow the black women who entered the field of history during and after the civil rights and black power movements, endured the turbulent 1970s, and opened up the field of black women's history in the 1980s. By comparing the experiences of older and younger generations, this collection makes visible the benefits and drawbacks of the institutionalization of African American and African American women's history. Telling Histories captures the voices of these pioneers, intimately and publicly. Contributors: Elsa Barkley Brown, University of Maryland Mia Bay, Rutgers University Leslie Brown, Washington University in St. Louis Crystal N. Feimster, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Sharon Harley, University of Maryland Wanda A. Hendricks, University of South Carolina Darlene Clark Hine, Northwestern University Chana Kai Lee, University of Georgia Jennifer L. Morgan, New York University Nell Irvin Painter, Newark, New Jersey Merline Pitre, Texas Southern University Barbara Ransby, University of Illinois at Chicago Julie Saville, University of Chicago Brenda Elaine Stevenson, University of California, Los Angeles Ula Taylor, University of California, Berkeley Rosalyn Terborg-Penn, Morgan State University Deborah Gray White, Rutgers University

Representing the Black Female Subject in Western Art

Representing the Black Female Subject in Western Art
Author: Charmaine A. Nelson
Release: 2010-06-10
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 258
ISBN: 9781136968075
Language: en
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This book offers the first concentrated examination of the representation of the black female subject in Western art through the lenses of race/color and sex/gender. Charmaine A. Nelson poses critical questions about the contexts of production, the problems of representation, the pathways of circulation and the consequences of consumption. She analyzes not only how, where, why and by whom black female subjects have been represented, but also what the social and cultural impacts of the colonial legacy of racialized western representation have been. Nelson also explores and problematizes the issue of the historically privileged white artistic access to black female bodies and the limits of representation for these subjects. This book not only reshapes our understanding of the black female representation in Western Art, but also furthers our knowledge about race and how and why it is (re)defined and (re)mobilized at specific times and places throughout history.

Black and White Women of the Old South

Black and White Women of the Old South
Author: Minrose Gwin
Release: 1985
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 238
ISBN: 0870494694
Language: en
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With Pen and Voice

With Pen and Voice
Author: Shirley Wilson Logan
Release: 1995
Editor: SIU Press
Pages: 169
ISBN: 080931875X
Language: en
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"O woman, woman! upon you I call; for upon your exertions almost entirely depends whether the rising generation shall be any thing more than we have been or not. O woman, woman! your example is powerful, your influence great."?Maria W. Stewart, "An Address Delivered Before the Afric-American Female Intelligence Society of Boston" (1832) Here?in the only collection of speeches by nineteenth-century African-American women?is the battle of words these brave women waged to address the social ills of their century. While there have been some scattered references to the unique roles these early "race women" played in effecting social change, until now few scholars have considered the rhetorical strategies they adopted to develop their powerful arguments. In this chronological anthology, Shirley Wilson Logan highlights the public addresses of these women, beginning with Maria W. Stewart's speech at Franklin Hall in 1832, believed to be the first delivered to an audience of men and women by an American-born woman. In her speech, she focused on the plight of the Northern free black. Sojourner Truth spoke in 1851 at the Akron, Ohio, Women's Rights Convention not only for the rights of black women but also for the rights of all oppressed nineteenth-century women. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper struggled with the conflict between universal suffrage and suffrage for black men. Anna Julia Cooper chastised her unique audience of black Episcopalian clergy for their failure to continue the tradition of the elevation of womanhood initiated by Christianity and especially for their failure to support the struggling Southern black woman. Ida B. Wells's rhetoric targeted mob violence directed at Southern black men. Her speech was delivered less than a year after her inaugural lecture on this issue?following a personal encounter with mob violence in Memphis. Fannie Barrier Williams and Victoria Earle Matthews advocated social and educational reforms to improve the plight of Southern black women. These speeches?all delivered between 1832 and 1895?are stirring proof that, despite obstacles of race and gender, these women still had the courage to mount the platform in defense of the oppressed. Introductory essays focus on each speaker's life and rhetoric, considering the ways in which these women selected evidence and adapted language to particular occasions, purposes, and audiences in order to persuade. This analysis of the rhetorical contexts and major rhetorical tactics in the speeches aids understanding of both the speeches and the skill of the speakers. A rhetorical timeline serves as a point of reference. Historically grounded, this book provides a black feminist perspective on significant events of the nineteenth century and reveals how black women of that era influenced and were influenced by the social problems they addressed. "A government which can protect and defend its citizens from wrong and outrage and does not is vicious. A government which would do it and cannot is weak; and where human life is insecure through either weakness or viciousness in the administration of law, there must be a lack of justice, and where this is wanting nothing can make up the deficiency."?Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, "Duty to Dependent Races," National Council of Women of the United States, Washington, D.C. (1891)

Mistresses and Slaves

Mistresses and Slaves
Author: Marli Frances Weiner
Release: 1998
Editor: University of Illinois Press
Pages: 308
ISBN: 0252066235
Language: en
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Marli Weiner challenges much of the received wisdom on the domestic realm of the nineteenth-century southern plantation--a world in which white mistresses and female slaves labored together to provide food, clothing, and medicines to the larger plantation community. Although divided by race, black and white women were joined by common female experiences and expectations of behavior. Because work and gender affected them as much as race, mistresses and female slaves interacted with one another very differently from the ways they interacted with men. Supported by the women's own words, Weiner offers fresh interpretations of the ideology of domesticity that influenced women's race relations before the Civil War, the gradual manner in which they changed during the war, and the harsher behaviors that resulted during Reconstruction. A volume in the series Women in American History, edited by Anne Firor Scott, Nancy A. Hewitt, and Stephanie Shaw

Within the Plantation Household

Within the Plantation Household
Author: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
Release: 2000-11-09
Editor: UNC Press Books
Pages: 563
ISBN: 9780807864227
Language: en
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Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing upon massive research in diaries, letters, memoirs, and oral histories, the author argues that the lives of antebellum southern women, enslaved and free, differed fundamentally from those of northern women and that it is not possible to understand antebellum southern women by applying models derived from New England sources.

Women and Slavery in America

Women and Slavery in America
Author: Catherine M. Lewis,J. Richard Lewis
Release: 2011-03-01
Editor: University of Arkansas Press
Pages: 318
ISBN: 9781557289582
Language: en
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Women and Slavery offers readers an opportunity to examine the establishment, growth, and evolution of slavery in the United States as it impacted women-enslaved and free, African American and white, wealthy and poor, northern and southern. The primary documents-including newspaper articles, broadsides, cartoons, pamphlets, speeches, photographs, memoirs, and editorials-are organized thematically and represent cultural, political, religious, economic, and social perspectives on this dark and complex period in American history.

Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth
Author: Carleton Mabee,Susan Mabee Newhouse
Release: 1995-03
Editor: NYU Press
Pages: 312
ISBN: 9780814755259
Language: en
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Many Americans have long since forgotten that there ever was slavery along the Hudson River. Yet Sojourner Truth was born a slave near the Hudson River in Ulster County, New York, in the late 1700s. Called merely Isabella as a slave, once freed she adopted the name of Sojourner Truth and became a national figure in the struggle for the emancipation of both blacks and women in Civil War America. Despite the discrimination she suffered as both a black and a woman, Truth significantly shaped both her own life and the struggle for human rights in America. Through her fierce intelligence, her resourcefulness, and her eloquence, she became widely acknowledged as a remarkable figure during her life, and she has become one of the most heavily mythologized figures in American history. While some of the myths about Truth have served positive functions, they have also contributed to distortions about American history, specifically about the history of blacks and women. In this landmark work, the product of years of primary research, Pulizter-Prize winning biographer Carleton Mabee has unearthed the best available sources about this remarkable woman to reconstruct her life as directly as the most original and reliable available sources permit. Included here are new insights on why she never learned to read, on the authenticity of the famous quotations attributed to her (such as Ar'n't I a woman?), her relationship to President Lincoln, her role in the abolitionist movement, her crusade to move freed slaves from the South to the North, and her life as a singer, orator, feminist and woman of faith. This is an engaging, historically precise biography that reassesses the place of Sojourner Truth—slave, prophet, legend--in American history. Sojourner Truth is one of the most famous and most mythologized figures in American history. Pulitzer-Prize-winning biographer Carleton Mabee unearths heretofore-neglected sources and offers valuable new insights into the life of a woman who, against all odds, became a central figure in the struggle for the emancipation of slaves and women in Civil War America.

Ladies of Labor Girls of Adventure

Ladies of Labor  Girls of Adventure
Author: Nan Enstad
Release: 1999
Editor: Columbia University Press
Pages: 266
ISBN: 0231111037
Language: en
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At the beginning of the twentieth century, labor leaders in women's unions routinely chastised their members for their ceaseless pursuit of fashion, avid reading of dime novels, and "affected" ways, including aristocratic airs and accents. Indeed, working women in America were eagerly participating in the burgeoning consumer culture available to them. While the leading activists, organizers, and radicals feared that consumerist tendencies made working women seem frivolous and dissuaded them from political action, these women, in fact, went on strike in very large numbers during the period, proving themselves to be politically active, astute, and effective. In Ladies of Labor, Girls of Adventure, historian Nan Enstad explores the complex relationship between consumer culture and political activism for late nineteenth- and twentieth-century working women. While consumerism did not make women into radicals, it helped shape their culture and their identities as both workers and political actors. Examining material ranging from early dime novels about ordinary women who inherit wealth or marry millionaires, to inexpensive, ready-to-wear clothing that allowed them to both deny and resist mistreatment in the workplace, Enstad analyzes how working women wove popular narratives and fashions into their developing sense of themselves as "ladies." She then provides a detailed examination of how this notion of "ladyhood" affected the great New York shirtwaist strike of 1909--1910. From the women's grievances, to the walkout of over 20,000 workers, to their style of picketing, Enstad shows how consumer culture was a central theme in this key event of labor strife. Finally, Enstad turns to the motion picture genre of female adventure serials, popular after 1912, which imbued "ladyhood" with heroines' strength, independence, and daring.

American Slave Coast

American Slave Coast
Author: Ned Sublette,Constance Sublette
Release: 2015-10-01
Editor: Chicago Review Press
Pages: 752
ISBN: 9781613748237
Language: en
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A wide-ranging, powerful, alternative vision of the history of the United States and how the slave-breeding industry shaped it The American Slave Coast tells the horrific story of how the slavery business in the United States made the reproductive labor of "breeding women" essential to the expansion of the nation. The book shows how slaves' children, and their children's children, were human savings accounts that were the basis of money and credit. This was so deeply embedded in the economy of the slave states that it could only be decommissioned by Emancipation, achieved through the bloodiest war in the history of the United States. The American Slave Coast is an alternative history of the United States that presents the slavery business, as well as familiar historical figures and events, in a revealing new light.