Celia a Slave

Celia  a Slave
Author: Melton A. McLaurin
Release: 2011-03-15
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Pages: 160
ISBN: 0820341592
Language: en
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Illuminating the moral dilemmas that lie at the heart of a slaveholding society, this book tells the story of a young slave who was sexually exploited by her master and ultimately executed for his murder. Celia was only fourteen years old when she was acquired by John Newsom, an aging widower and one of the most prosperous and respected citizens of Callaway County, Missouri. The pattern of sexual abuse that would mark their entire relationship began almost immediately. After purchasing Celia in a neighboring county, Newsom raped her on the journey back to his farm. He then established her in a small cabin near his house and visited her regularly (most likely with the knowledge of the son and two daughters who lived with him). Over the next five years, Celia bore Newsom two children; meanwhile, she became involved with a slave named George and resolved at his insistence to end the relationship with her master. When Newsom refused, Celia one night struck him fatally with a club and disposed of his body in her fireplace. Her act quickly discovered, Celia was brought to trial. She received a surprisingly vigorous defense from her court-appointed attorneys, who built their case on a state law allowing women the use of deadly force to defend their honor. Nevertheless, the court upheld the tenets of a white social order that wielded almost total control over the lives of slaves. Celia was found guilty and hanged. Melton A. McLaurin uses Celia's story to reveal the tensions that strained the fabric of antebellum southern society. Celia's case demonstrates how one master's abuse of power over a single slave forced whites to make moral decisions about the nature of slavery. McLaurin focuses sharply on the role of gender, exploring the degree to which female slaves were sexually exploited, the conditions that often prevented white women from stopping such abuse, and the inability of male slaves to defend slave women. Setting the case in the context of the 1850s slavery debates, he also probes the manner in which the legal system was used to justify slavery. By granting slaves certain statutory rights (which were usually rendered meaningless by the customary prerogatives of masters), southerners could argue that they observed moral restraint in the operations of their peculiar institution. An important addition to our understanding of the pre-Civil War era, Celia, A Slave is also an intensely compelling narrative of one woman pushed beyond the limits of her endurance by a system that denied her humanity at the most basic level.

Celia a Slave

Celia  a Slave
Author: Melton Alonza McLaurin
Release: 1991
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Pages: 148
ISBN: 0820313521
Language: en
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Recounts the story of Celia, a slave in antebellum Missouri who killed her master after five years of sexual abuse at his hands and was later found guilty of murder and hanged

Celia A Slave

Celia  A Slave
Author: Melton A. Mclaurin
Release: 1993-02-01
Editor: Harper Collins
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9780380719358
Language: en
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In 1850, fourteen-year-old Celia became the property of Robert Newsom, a prosperous and respected Missouri farmer. For the next five years, she was cruelly and repeatedly molested by her abusive master--and bore him two children in the process. But in 1855, driven to the limits of her endurance, Celia fought back. And at the tender age of eighteen, the desperate and frightened young black woman found herself on trial for Newsom's murder--the defendant in a landmark courtroom battle that threatened to undermine the very foundations of the South's most cherished institution. Based on court records, correspondences and newspaper accounts past and present, Celia, A Slave is a powerful masterwork of passion and scholarship--a stunning literary achievement that brilliantly illuminates one of the most extraordinary events in the long, dark history of slavery in America.

Celia a Slave

Celia  a Slave
Author: Barbara Seyda
Release: 2016-01-01
Editor: Yale University Press
Pages: 94
ISBN: 9780300197068
Language: en
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The ninth winner of the Yale Drama Series is a searing and powerful drama of slave litigation, injustice, institutional racism, and the rule of law. The winner of the 2015 Yale Drama Series playwriting competition was selected by Nicholas Wright, former Associate Director of London's Royal Court. Barbara Seyda's stunningly theatrical Celia, a Slave is a vivid tableau of interviews with the dead that interweaves oral histories with official archival records. Powerful, poetic, and stylistically bold, this work foregrounds twenty-three diverse characters to recall the events that led to the hanging of nineteen-year-old Celia, an African American slave convicted in a Missouri court of murdering her master, the prosperous landowner Robert Newsom, in 1855. Excavating actual trial transcripts and court records, Seyda bears witness to racial and sexual violence in U.S. history, illuminating the brutal realities of female slave life in the pre-Civil War South while exploring the intersection of rape, morality, economics, and gender politics that continue to resonate today.

Slavery s Constitution

Slavery s Constitution
Author: David Waldstreicher
Release: 2010-06-22
Editor: Hill and Wang
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9781429959070
Language: en
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Taking on decades of received wisdom, David Waldstreicher has written the first book to recognize slavery's place at the heart of the U.S. Constitution. Famously, the Constitution never mentions slavery. And yet, of its eighty-four clauses, six were directly concerned with slaves and the interests of their owners. Five other clauses had implications for slavery that were considered and debated by the delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention and the citizens of the states during ratification. This "peculiar institution" was not a moral blind spot for America's otherwise enlightened framers, nor was it the expression of a mere economic interest. Slavery was as important to the making of the Constitution as the Constitution was to the survival of slavery. By tracing slavery from before the revolution, through the Constitution's framing, and into the public debate that followed, Waldstreicher rigorously shows that slavery was not only actively discussed behind the closed and locked doors of the Constitutional Convention, but that it was also deftly woven into the Constitution itself. For one thing, slavery was central to the American economy, and since the document set the stage for a national economy, the Constitution could not avoid having implications for slavery. Even more, since the government defined sovereignty over individuals, as well as property in them, discussion of sovereignty led directly to debate over slavery's place in the new republic. Finding meaning in silences that have long been ignored, Slavery's Constitution is a vital and sorely needed contribution to the conversation about the origins, impact, and meaning of our nation's founding document.

Pirates

Pirates
Author: Celia Rees
Release: 2021-10-14
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9781526637314
Language: en
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From the author of the bestselling and award-winning WITCH CHILD, comes another outstanding historical novel. When two young women meet under extraordinary circumstances in the eighteenth-century West Indies, they are unified in their desire to escape their oppressive lives. The first is a slave, forced to work in a plantation mansion and subjected to terrible cruelty at the hands of the plantation manager. The second is a spirited and rebellious English girl, sent to the West Indies to marry well. But fate ensures that one night the two young women have to save each other and run away to a life no less dangerous but certainly a lot more free. As pirates, they roam the seas, fight pitched battles against their foes and become embroiled in many a heart-quickening adventure. Written in brilliant and sparkling first-person narrative, this is a wonderful novel in which Celia Rees has brought the past vividly and intimately to life.

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl EasyRead Super Large 20pt Edition

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl  EasyRead Super Large 20pt Edition
Author: Harriet A. Jacobs
Release: 2008-11-05
Editor: ReadHowYouWant.com
Pages: 500
ISBN: 9781442901445
Language: en
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Books for All Kinds of Readers Read HowYouWant offers the widest selection of on-demand, accessible format editions on the market today. Our 7 different sizes of EasyRead are optimized by increasing the font size and spacing between the words and the letters. We partner with leading publishers around the globe. Our goal is to have accessible editions simultaneously released with publishers' new books so that all readers can have access to the books they want to read. To find more books in your format visit www.readhowyouwant.com

African Cherokees in Indian Territory

African Cherokees in Indian Territory
Author: Celia E. Naylor
Release: 2009-09-15
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Pages: 376
ISBN: 0807877549
Language: en
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Forcibly removed from their homes in the late 1830s, Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, and Chickasaw Indians brought their African-descended slaves with them along the Trail of Tears and resettled in Indian Territory, present-day Oklahoma. Celia E. Naylor vividly charts the experiences of enslaved and free African Cherokees from the Trail of Tears to Oklahoma's entry into the Union in 1907. Carefully extracting the voices of former slaves from interviews and mining a range of sources in Oklahoma, she creates an engaging narrative of the composite lives of African Cherokees. Naylor explores how slaves connected with Indian communities not only through Indian customs--language, clothing, and food--but also through bonds of kinship. Examining this intricate and emotionally charged history, Naylor demonstrates that the "red over black" relationship was no more benign than "white over black." She presents new angles to traditional understandings of slave resistance and counters previous romanticized ideas of slavery in the Cherokee Nation. She also challenges contemporary racial and cultural conceptions of African-descended people in the United States. Naylor reveals how black Cherokee identities evolved reflecting complex notions about race, culture, "blood," kinship, and nationality. Indeed, Cherokee freedpeople's struggle for recognition and equal rights that began in the nineteenth century continues even today in Oklahoma.

The Price for Their Pound of Flesh

The Price for Their Pound of Flesh
Author: Daina Ramey Berry
Release: 2017
Editor: Beacon Press
Pages: 262
ISBN: 9780807047620
Language: en
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"Groundbreaking look at slaves as commodities through every phase of life, from birth to death and beyond, in early America The Price for Their Pound of Flesh is the first book to explore the economic value of enslaved people through every phase of their lives--including from before birth to after death--in the American domestic slave trades. Covering the full "life cycle" (including preconception, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, the senior years, and death), historian Daina Berry shows the lengths to which slaveholders would go to maximize profits. She draws from over ten years of research to explore how enslaved people responded to being appraised, bartered, and sold. By illuminating their lives, Berry ensures that the individuals she studies are regarded as people, not merely commodities. Analyzing the depth of this monetization of human property will change the way we think about slavery, reparations, capitalism, and nineteenth-century medical education"--

The Confessions of Nat Turner

The Confessions of Nat Turner
Author: Kenneth S. Greenberg
Release: 2016-09-02
Editor: Macmillan Higher Education
Pages: 160
ISBN: 9781319064877
Language: en
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Twenty years after the publication of the first edition of this volume, Nat Turner and the rebels of 1831 remain central figures in American culture. Kenneth S. Greenberg's revised introduction updates the role of Nat Turner in American memory and also includes the latest scholarship on topics such as the importance of neighborhoods to the community of enslaved people and the role of women in resisting enslavement. New to this edition is a significant excerpt from David Walker's 1830 Appeal - a radical attack on slavery from a Boston based African American intellectual that circulated near the area of the rebellion and echoed key themes of The Confessions of Nat Turner. The Appeal will compel students to ponder the question of Turner's connection to a larger African American liberation movement. This volume's appendixes offer an updated Chronology, Questions for Consideration, and Selected Bibliography, tools that will serve to facilitate the use of this book in the classroom.

Celia a Slave

Celia  a Slave
Author: Melton Alonza McLaurin
Release: 1993
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 178
ISBN: OCLC:1029278407
Language: en
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American Slavery as it is

American Slavery as it is
Author: American Anti-Slavery Society
Release: 1839
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 224
ISBN: BCUL:VD2266460
Language: en
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Published in 1839 and edited by abolitionist Theodore Dwight Weld, this work presents hundreds of primary-source accounts of the reality of slavery in the American South.The book's first section collects vivid first-person accounts by former slaves of their lives in slavery. In the second part, Weld offers page after page of stark quotationssome as short as a single sentencefrom various Southern periodicals that illustrate in graphic detail the bondage, floggings, maimings and other horrors endured by slaves. Weld also presents and dissects various pro-slavery arguments. Distributed by the American Anti-Slavery Society, American Slavery As It Is was second only to Uncle Tom's Cabin for its impact on the anti-slavery movement in the United States.

Accounting for Slavery

Accounting for Slavery
Author: Caitlin Rosenthal
Release: 2019-09-15
Editor: Harvard University Press
Pages: 295
ISBN: 9780674241657
Language: en
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Caitlin Rosenthal explores quantitative management practices on West Indian and Southern plantations, showing how planter-capitalists built sophisticated organizations and used complex accounting tools. By demonstrating that business innovation can be a byproduct of bondage Rosenthal further erodes the false boundary between capitalism and slavery.

Slave Nation

Slave Nation
Author: Alfred W. Blumrosen,Ruth G. Blumrosen
Release: 2006-11-01
Editor: Sourcebooks, Inc.
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9781402226113
Language: en
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A chilling history of the profound role that slavery played in the founding of the republic.

Sexuality and Slavery

Sexuality and Slavery
Author: Daina Ramey Berry,Leslie Maria Harris
Release: 2018-10-01
Editor: University of Georgia Press
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780820354033
Language: en
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"A Sarah Mills Hodge Fund publication"--Title page verso.

Thirty Years a Slave

Thirty Years a Slave
Author: Louis Hughes
Release: 101-01-01
Editor: Prabhat Prakashan
Pages: 329
ISBN:
Language: en
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"Thirty Years a Slave" by Louis Hughes. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read.

Unruly Women

Unruly Women
Author: Victoria E. Bynum
Release: 2016-08-01
Editor: UNC Press Books
Pages: 250
ISBN: 9781469616995
Language: en
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In this richly detailed and imaginatively researched study, Victoria Bynum investigates "unruly" women in central North Carolina before and during the Civil War. Analyzing the complex and interrelated impact of gender, race, class, and region on the lives of black and white women, she shows how their diverse experiences and behavior reflected and influenced the changing social order and political economy of the state and region. Her work expands our knowledge of black and white women by studying them outside the plantation setting. Bynum searched local and state court records, public documents, and manuscript collections to locate and document the lives of these otherwise ordinary, obscure women. Some appeared in court as abused, sometimes abusive, wives, as victims and sometimes perpetrators of violent assaults, or as participants in ilicit, interracial relationships. During the Civil War, women freqently were cited for theft, trespassing, or rioting, usually in an effort to gain goods made scarce by war. Some women were charged with harboring evaders or deserters of the Confederacy, an act that reflected their conviction that the Confederacy was destroying them. These politically powerless unruly women threatened to disrupt the underlying social structure of the Old South, which depended on the services and cooperation of all women. Bynum examines the effects of women's social and sexual behavior on the dominant society and shows the ways in which power flowed between private and public spheres. Whether wives or unmarried, enslaved or free, women were active agents of the society's ordering and dissolution.

Celia a Slave

Celia  a Slave
Author: Melton A. MacLaurin
Release: 1991
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0780729315
Language: en
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Heart of a Slave

Heart of a Slave
Author: Verna Cyril
Release: 2020-03-11
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 154
ISBN: 9798621195496
Language: en
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A warrior's daughter should never show weakness even when the earth falls apart under her feet...Siwhetta, an African girl, is captured and sold into the slave trade in 1814 and shipped to the West Indies. Despite her initial resistance, she is ensnared in a steamy love affair with the young, noble aristocrat, Dimitri. However, as the daughter of a tribal warrior, Siwhetta is defiant, passionate, and determined to return to her homeland.Dimitri, on the other hand, enamored of this nubile, ebony beauty is possessive and takes what he wants, and thus far, his eyes are set on Siwhetta. Intent on possessing her, he will stop at nothing to get her into his arms even if it meant breaking every rule in the book.

The Slave Girl

The Slave Girl
Author: Ivo Andri?
Release: 2009-01-01
Editor: Central European University Press
Pages: 540
ISBN: 9639776424
Language: en
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Presents a collection of short stories that focus on women's roles in society.