In Small Things Forgotten

In Small Things Forgotten
Author: James Deetz
Release: 2010-07-07
Editor: Anchor
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9780307874382
Language: en
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History is recorded in many ways. According to author James Deetz, the past can be seen most fully by studying the small things so often forgotten. Objects such as doorways, gravestones, musical instruments, and even shards of pottery fill in the cracks between large historical events and depict the intricacies of daily life. In his completely revised and expanded edition of In Small Things Forgotten, Deetz has added new sections that more fully acknowledge the presence of women and African Americans in Colonial America. New interpretations of archaeological finds detail how minorities influenced and were affected by the development of the Anglo-American tradition in the years following the settlers' arrival in Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1620. Among Deetz's observations: Subtle changes in building long before the Revolutionary War hinted at the growing independence of the American colonies and their desire to be less like the British. Records of estate auctions show that many households in Colonial America contained only one chair--underscoring the patriarchal nature of the early American family. All other members of the household sat on stools or the floor. The excavation of a tiny community of freed slaves in Massachusetts reveals evidence of the transplantation of African culture to North America. Simultaneously a study of American life and an explanation of how American life is studied, In Small Things Forgotten, through the everyday details of ordinary living, colorfully depicts a world hundreds of years in the past.

In Small Things Forgotten

In Small Things Forgotten
Author: James Deetz
Release: 1996
Editor: Anchor
Pages: 184
ISBN: 9780385483995
Language: en
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An archaeological examination of Anglo-American culture

In Small Things Forgotten

In Small Things Forgotten
Author: James Deetz
Release: 1996
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 284
ISBN: 1299175260
Language: en
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History is recorded in many ways. According to author James Deetz, the past is given new dimensions by studying the small things so often forgotten. Doorways, gravestones, musical instruments, and shards of pottery (objects so plain they would never be displayed in a museum) depict the intricacies of daily life. In this completely revised and expanded edition of In Small Things Forgotten, Deetz has added a chapter addressing the influence of African culture - a culture so strong it survived the Middle Passage and the oppression of slavery - on America in the years following the settler's arrival in Jamestown, Virginia. Simultaneously a study of American life and an explanation of how American life is studied, In Small Things Forgotten colorfully depicts a world hundreds of years in the past through the details of ordinary living.

The Times of Their Lives

The Times of Their Lives
Author: James Deetz,Patricia E. Scott Deetz
Release: 2001
Editor: Anchor
Pages: 367
ISBN: 9780385721530
Language: en
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Offers an honest, often startling portrait of Plymouth Colony, including the legal system, religion, agriculture, family life, women's roles, alcohol use, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, suspicious deaths, and violent crimes. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.

Invitation to Archaeology

Invitation to Archaeology
Author: James Deetz
Release: 1967
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 150
ISBN: UOM:39015002295783
Language: en
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Review of the field for the amateur archaeologist, the beginning student, and the general reader.

Historical Archaeology

Historical Archaeology
Author: Pedro Paulo A. Funari,Martin Hall,Sian Jones
Release: 2013-03-07
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 376
ISBN: 9781134816163
Language: en
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Historical Archaeology demonstrates the potential of adopting a flexible, encompassing definition of historical archaeology which involves the study of all societies with documentary evidence. It encourages research that goes beyond the boundaries between prehistory and history. Ranging in subject matter from Roman Britain and Classical Greece, to colonial Africa, Brazil and the United States, the contributors present a much broader range of perspectives than is currently the trend.

The God of Small Things

The God of Small Things
Author: Arundhati Roy
Release: 2011-07-27
Editor: Vintage Canada
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9780307374677
Language: en
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The beloved debut novel about an affluent Indian family forever changed by one fateful day in 1969, from the author of The Ministry of Utmost Happiness NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • MAN BOOKER PRIZE WINNER Compared favorably to the works of Faulkner and Dickens, Arundhati Roy’s modern classic is equal parts powerful family saga, forbidden love story, and piercing political drama. The seven-year-old twins Estha and Rahel see their world shaken irrevocably by the arrival of their beautiful young cousin, Sophie. It is an event that will lead to an illicit liaison and tragedies accidental and intentional, exposing “big things [that] lurk unsaid” in a country drifting dangerously toward unrest. Lush, lyrical, and unnerving, The God of Small Things is an award-winning landmark that started for its author an esteemed career of fiction and political commentary that continues unabated.

Black Feminist Archaeology

Black Feminist Archaeology
Author: Whitney Battle-Baptiste
Release: 2017-07-05
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9781351573559
Language: en
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Black feminist thought has developed in various parts of the academy for over three decades, but has made only minor inroads into archaeological theory and practice. Whitney Battle-Baptiste outlines the basic tenets of Black feminist thought and research for archaeologists and shows how it can be used to improve contemporary historical archaeology. She demonstrates this using Andrew Jackson‘s Hermitage, the W. E. B. Du Bois Homesite in Massachusetts, and the Lucy Foster house in Andover, which represented the first archaeological excavation of an African American home. Her call for an archaeology more sensitive to questions of race and gender is an important development for the field.

Critical Historical Archaeology

Critical Historical Archaeology
Author: Mark P Leone
Release: 2016-09-16
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 248
ISBN: 9781315431192
Language: en
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How can we use the past to make sense of the issues and problems that concern us in the present? Mark Leone, the leading critical theorist in historical archaeology, urges archaeologists to view their discipline as an activist pursuit. This volume is partly his autobiographical reflection on a thirty five year career, part a collection of Leone’s classic writings on Annapolis, Williamsburg, Shakertown, St. Mary’s, and other key sites, and part a synthesis of his current thinking on how historical archaeology can engage the cultural and political issues of our time. Critical Historical Archaeology is an important summary of the work and thinking of one of our most thoughtful, influential archaeologists.

Small Things Forgotten

Small Things Forgotten
Author: Prudence M. Rice,Don S. Rice,Timothy W. Pugh
Release: 2017-05-30
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0988733080
Language: en
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Forgetting

Forgetting
Author: Scott A. Small
Release: 2021-07-13
Editor: Crown
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780593136201
Language: en
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“Fascinating and useful . . . The distinguished memory researcher Scott A. Small explains why forgetfulness is not only normal but also beneficial.”—Walter Isaacson, bestselling author of The Code Breaker and Leonardo da Vinci Who wouldn’t want a better memory? Dr. Scott Small has dedicated his career to understanding why memory forsakes us. As director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Columbia University, he focuses largely on patients who experience pathological forgetting, and it is in contrast to their suffering that normal forgetting, which we experience every day, appears in sharp relief. Until recently, most everyone—memory scientists included—believed that forgetting served no purpose. But new research in psychology, neurobiology, medicine, and computer science tells a different story. Forgetting is not a failure of our minds. It’s not even a benign glitch. It is, in fact, good for us—and, alongside memory, it is a required function for our minds to work best. Forgetting benefits our cognitive and creative abilities, emotional well-being, and even our personal and societal health. As frustrating as a typical lapse can be, it’s precisely what opens up our minds to making better decisions, experiencing joy and relationships, and flourishing artistically. From studies of bonobos in the wild to visits with the iconic painter Jasper Johns and the renowned decision-making expert Daniel Kahneman, Small looks across disciplines to put new scientific findings into illuminating context while also revealing groundbreaking developments about Alzheimer’s disease. The next time you forget where you left your keys, remember that a little forgetting does a lot of good.

Material Culture Studies in America

Material Culture Studies in America
Author: Thomas J. Schlereth
Release: 1999
Editor: Rowman Altamira
Pages: 419
ISBN: 0761991603
Language: en
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The country's leading authority on use of artifactual evidence in historical research collects twenty-five classic essays and gives his overview of the field of material culture.

Boomtown Saloons

Boomtown Saloons
Author: Kelly J. Dixon
Release: 2006-12-01
Editor: University of Nevada Press
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780874176391
Language: en
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The image of Old West saloons as sites of violence and raucous entertainment has been perpetuated by film and legend, but the true story of such establishments is far more complex. In Boomtown Saloons, archaeologist Kelly J. Dixon recounts the excavation of four historic saloon sites in Nevada’s Virginia City, one of the West’s most important boomtowns, and shows how the physical traces of this handful of disparate drinking places offer a new perspective on authentic life in the mining West. During the second half of the nineteenth century, the Comstock Lode’s mineral wealth attracted people from all over the world. At its peak, Virginia City had a cosmopolitan population of over 20,000 people. Like people everywhere, they sought to pass their leisure time in congenial company, often in one or another of the four saloons studied here. Dixon’s account of the role these four establishments played in the social and economic life of Virginia City offers keen insight into the businesses and people who made up the backdrop of a mining boomtown. The saloons in this study were quieter than legend would have us believe; they served relatively distinct groups and offered their customers a place of refuge, solidarity, and social contact with peers in a city where few people had longtime ties or initially any close contacts. Boomtown Saloons also offers an equally vivid portrait of the modern historical archaeologist who combines time-honored digging, reconstruction, and analysis methods with such cutting-edge technology as DNA analysis of saliva traces on a 150-year-old pipestem and chemical analysis of the residue in discarded condiment bottles. The book is illustrated with historical photographs and maps, as well as photographs of artifacts uncovered during the excavations of the four sites. Dixon’s sparkling text and thoughtful interpretation of evidence reveal an unknown aspect of daily life in one of the West’s most storied boomtowns and demonstrate that, contrary to legend, the traditional western saloon served an vital and complex social role in its community.Available in hardcover and paperback.

What This Awl Means

What This Awl Means
Author: Janet Spector
Release: 2014-11-21
Editor: Minnesota Historical Society Press
Pages: 161
ISBN: 0873517571
Language: en
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This pioneering work focuses on excavations and discoveries at Little Rapids, a 19th-century Eastern Dakota planting village near present-day Minneapolis.

The Book of Lost Things

The Book of Lost Things
Author: John Connolly
Release: 2006-11-07
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Pages: 339
ISBN: 9780743298858
Language: en
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Taking refuge in fairy tales after the loss of his mother, twelve-year-old David finds himself violently propelled into an imaginary land in which the boundaries of fantasy and reality are disturbingly melded. By the author of The Black Angel. 75,000 first printing.

Historical Archaeology

Historical Archaeology
Author: Barbara J Little
Release: 2016-06-16
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9781315427393
Language: en
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What is historical archaeology and why is it important? Well-known archaeologist Barbara Little addresses these key questions for introductory students in this concise, inexpensive, and well-written text. Little covers the goals of historical archaeological work, the kinds of questions it asks, and the ethical and political concerns it raises. She shows what historical archaeology can provide that neither of its parent disciplines can offer alone. Little offers brief snapshots of key American sites: Jamestown, Mission San Luis, West Oakland, the African American Burial Ground, and the Garbage Project, among others. And she shows how historical archaeology is inextricably linked to public education, justice issues, and our collective understanding of the past. As an introductory guide for historical archaeology and similar courses, or as thought-provoking reading for professionals, this volume is unmatched in quality and scope.

Digging in the City of Brotherly Love

Digging in the City of Brotherly Love
Author: Rebecca Yamin
Release: 2008-10-07
Editor: Yale University Press
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780300142648
Language: en
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Beneath the modern city of Philadelphia lie countless clues to its history and the lives of residents long forgotten. This intriguing book explores eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Philadelphia through the findings of archaeological excavations, sharing with readers the excitement of digging into the past and reconstructing the lives of earlier inhabitants of the city.Urban archaeologist Rebecca Yamin describes the major excavations that have been undertaken since 1992 as part of the redevelopment of Independence Mall and surrounding areas, explaining how archaeologists gather and use raw data to learn more about the ordinary people whose lives were never recorded in history books. Focusing primarily on these unknown citizens-an accountant in the first Treasury Department, a coachmaker whose clients were politicians doing business at the State House, an African American founder of St. Thomas’s African Episcopal Church, and others-Yamin presents a colorful portrait of old Philadelphia. She also discusses political aspects of archaeology today-who supports particular projects and why, and what has been lost to bulldozers and heedlessness. Digging in the City of Brotherly Love tells the exhilarating story of doing archaeology in the real world and using its findings to understand the past.

Historic Underground Missoula

Historic Underground Missoula
Author: Nikki M. Manning
Release: 2015
Editor: Arcadia Publishing
Pages: 144
ISBN: 9781626199194
Language: en
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Much of Missoula's history lies beneath the surface. As in many Old West cities, cavernous underground tunnel systems purportedly hid countless nefarious activities, from clandestine prostitution and Chinese opium dens to booze running during Prohibition. These sordid tales captivate today's residents and beg questions about the city's furtive past. Did local elite gentlemen mask their carnal habits there? Did John Wayne really use the passageways to run personal errands unnoticed? Author and urban archaeologist Nikki Manning ventures below to reconcile oral history with archaeological data in a fascinating exploration of Missoula's subterranean labyrinths.

The Battle for Christmas

The Battle for Christmas
Author: Stephen Nissenbaum
Release: 2010-12-01
Editor: Vintage
Pages: 400
ISBN: 9780307760227
Language: en
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Anyone who laments the excesses of Christmas might consider the Puritans of colonial Massachusetts: they simply outlawed the holiday. The Puritans had their reasons, since Christmas was once an occasion for drunkenness and riot, when poor "wassailers extorted food and drink from the well-to-do. In this intriguing and innovative work of social history, Stephen Nissenbaum rediscovers Christmas's carnival origins and shows how it was transformed, during the nineteenth century, into a festival of domesticity and consumerism. Drawing on a wealth of period documents and illustrations, Nissenbaum charts the invention of our current Yuletide traditions, from St. Nicholas to the Christmas tree and, perhaps most radically, the practice of giving gifts to children. Bursting with detail, filled with subversive readings of such seasonal classics as "A Visit from St. Nicholas” and A Christmas Carol, The Battle for Christmas captures the glorious strangeness of the past even as it helps us better understand our present.

The Memory of Forgotten Things

The Memory of Forgotten Things
Author: Kat Zhang
Release: 2018-05-15
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781481478670
Language: en
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“A heart-tugging and mind-bending exploration of time and possibility.” —School Library Journal “A pleasure to read…full of heart and imagination.” —Kirkus Reviews “Zhang’s story is filled with real-world lessons on compassion and kindness with a sci-fi twist—a skillfully rendered framing device for exploring deeper issues of loss, longing, and acceptance.” —Publishers Weekly “With unwavering hope and focus, and new friendships with unlikely peers, the novel is entertaining and sweet.” —Booklist In the tradition of The Thing About Jellyfish and When You Reach Me, acclaimed author Kat Zhang offers a luminous and heartbreaking novel about a girl who is convinced that an upcoming solar eclipse will bring back her dead mother. One of the happiest memories twelve-year-old Sophia Wallace has is of her tenth birthday. Her mother made her a cake that year—and not a cake from a boxed-mix, but from scratch. She remembers the way the frosting tasted, the way the pink sugar roses dissolved on her tongue. This memory, and a scant few others like it, is all Sophia has of her mother, so she keeps them close. She keeps them secret, too. Because as paltry as these memories are, she shouldn’t have them at all. The truth is, Sophia Wallace’s mother died when she was six years old. But that isn’t how she remembers it. Not always. Sophia has never told anyone about her unusual memories—snapshots of a past that never happened. But everything changes when Sophia’s seventh grade English class gets an assignment to research solar eclipses. She becomes convinced that the upcoming solar eclipse will grant her the opportunity to make her alternate life come true, to enter a world where her mother never died. With the help of two misfit boys, she must figure out a way to bring her mother back to her—before the opportunity is lost forever.