Rethinking the Color Line

Rethinking the Color Line
Author: Charles A. Gallagher
Release: 2018-09-03
Editor: SAGE Publications, Incorporated
Pages: 600
ISBN: 1506394132
Language: en
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Charles A. Gallagher’s best-selling reader is now with SAGE Publishing! User-friendly without sacrificing intellectual or theoretical rigor, this popular anthology for race and ethnic relations courses introduces students to classic statements, contemporary favorites, and works by early career scholars. Rethinking the Color Line helps make sense of how race and ethnicity influence aspects of social life in ways that are often made invisible by culture, politics, and economics. The readings reflect a variety of approaches to studying race and ethnicity: a focus on specific minority groups; two or more groups in comparative perspective; and topics that look at the experience of many groups historically and within social institutions. Readers will see how they influence and in turn are influenced by race and ethnic relations. The new Sixth Edition has been thoroughly revised, with 18 new selections addressing topics that reflect the current debates and state of contemporary U.S. race relations, including: Current representations of Arabs and Muslims in the media Links among racial discrimination, stress, and public health outcomes How skin bleaching and cosmetic surgery are used to acquire racial “capital” The rising racial wealth gap How the race of drug users can turn a “crime” problem into a “public health” problem How race shapes immigration policies Home DNA ancestry tests and the blurring of existing racial boundaries

Rethinking the Color Line

Rethinking the Color Line
Author: Charles Andrew Gallagher
Release: 1999
Editor: McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages
Pages: 545
ISBN: UOM:39015050063091
Language: en
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A collection for an undergraduate course, providing a theoretical framework and analytical tools and discussing the meaning of race and ethnicity as a social construction. The readings are designed to require students to negotiate between individual agency and the constraints of social structure, an

Tripping on the Color Line

Tripping on the Color Line
Author: Heather M. Dalmage
Release: 2000
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Pages: 200
ISBN: 0813528445
Language: en
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At the turn of the twentieth century W.E.B. DuBois predicted that the central problem facing the United States in the new century would be that of the “color line.” Now, at the beginning of a new century, we find many people straddling the color line. These people come from the growing number of multiracial families in America, families who search for places of comfort and familiarity in a racially polarized society whose educational system, places of worship, and neighborhoods continue to suffer a de facto segregation. This group has provoked an ever-widening debate and an upheaval in traditional racial thinking in the United States. Through in-depth interviews with individuals from black–white multiracial families, and insightful sociological analysis, Heather M. Dalmage examines the challenges faced by people living in such families and explores how their experiences demonstrate the need for rethinking race in America. She examines the lived reality of race in the ways multiracial family members construct and describe their own identities and sense of community and politics. She shows how people whose own very lives complicate the idea of the color line must continually negotiate and contest it in order not to reproduce it. Their lack of language to describe their multiracial existence, along with their experience of coping with racial ambiguity and with institutional demands to conform to a racially divided, racist system is the central theme of Tripping on the Color Line. By connecting the stories to specific issues, such as census categories, transracial adoption, intermarriage, as well as the many social responses to violations of the color line, Dalmage raises the debate to a broad discussion on racial essentialism and social justice. Exploring the dynamic of race as it pervades the lives of those close to the color line, Dalmage argues that the struggle for racial justice must include an understanding that race is a complex construct that is constantly shifting, and is something we do rather than something we simply are.

Race in the Schoolyard

Race in the Schoolyard
Author: Amanda E. Lewis,Associate Professor of Sociology Amanda E Lewis
Release: 2003
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Pages: 243
ISBN: 0813532256
Language: en
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Annotation An exploration of how race is explicitly and implicitly handled in school.

A Different Mirror

A Different Mirror
Author: Ronald Takaki
Release: 2012-06-05
Editor: eBookIt.com
Pages: 529
ISBN: 9781456611064
Language: en
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Takaki traces the economic and political history of Indians, African Americans, Mexicans, Japanese, Chinese, Irish, and Jewish people in America, with considerable attention given to instances and consequences of racism. The narrative is laced with short quotations, cameos of personal experiences, and excerpts from folk music and literature. Well-known occurrences, such as the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, the Trail of Tears, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Japanese internment are included. Students may be surprised by some of the revelations, but will recognize a constant thread of rampant racism. The author concludes with a summary of today's changing economic climate and offers Rodney King's challenge to all of us to try to get along. Readers will find this overview to be an accessible, cogent jumping-off place for American history and political science plus a guide to the myriad other sources identified in the notes.

Race Color Identity

Race  Color  Identity
Author: Efraim Sicher
Release: 2013-05-30
Editor: Berghahn Books
Pages: 398
ISBN: 9780857458933
Language: en
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Advances in genetics are renewing controversies over inherited characteristics, and the discourse around science and technological innovations has taken on racial overtones, such as attributing inherited physiological traits to certain ethnic groups or using DNA testing to determine biological links with ethnic ancestry. This book contributes to the discussion by opening up previously locked concepts of the relation between the terms color, race, and "Jews", and by engaging with globalism, multiculturalism, hybridity, and diaspora. The contributors-leading scholars in anthropology, sociology, history, literature, and cultural studies-discuss how it is not merely a question of whether Jews are acknowledged to be interracial, but how to address academic and social discourses that continue to place Jews and others in a race/color category.

A People s History of the United States

A People s History of the United States
Author: Howard Zinn
Release: 1996
Editor: Aristotext
Pages: 675
ISBN:
Language: en
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In this Second Edition of this radical social history of America from Columbus to the present, Howard Zinn includes substantial coverage of the Carter, Reagan and Bush years and an Afterword on the Clinton presidency. Its commitment and vigorous style mean it will be compelling reading for under-graduate and post-graduate students and scholars in American social history and American studies, as well as the general reader.

The Lies that Bind Rethinking Identity

The Lies that Bind  Rethinking Identity
Author: Kwame Anthony Appiah
Release: 2018-08-28
Editor: Liveright Publishing
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781631493843
Language: en
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A Washington Post Notable Book of the Year As seen on the Netflix series Explained From the best-selling author of Cosmopolitanism comes this revealing exploration of how the collective identities that shape our polarized world are riddled with contradiction. Who do you think you are? That’s a question bound up in another: What do you think you are? Gender. Religion. Race. Nationality. Class. Culture. Such affiliations give contours to our sense of self, and shape our polarized world. Yet the collective identities they spawn are riddled with contradictions, and cratered with falsehoods. Kwame Anthony Appiah’s The Lies That Bind is an incandescent exploration of the nature and history of the identities that define us. It challenges our assumptions about how identities work. We all know there are conflicts between identities, but Appiah shows how identities are created by conflict. Religion, he demonstrates, gains power because it isn’t primarily about belief. Our everyday notions of race are the detritus of discarded nineteenth-century science. Our cherished concept of the sovereign nation—of self-rule—is incoherent and unstable. Class systems can become entrenched by efforts to reform them. Even the very idea of Western culture is a shimmering mirage. From Anton Wilhelm Amo, the eighteenth-century African child who miraculously became an eminent European philosopher before retiring back to Africa, to Italo Svevo, the literary marvel who changed citizenship without leaving home, to Appiah’s own father, Joseph, an anticolonial firebrand who was ready to give his life for a nation that did not yet exist, Appiah interweaves keen-edged argument with vibrant narratives to expose the myths behind our collective identities. These “mistaken identities,” Appiah explains, can fuel some of our worst atrocities—from chattel slavery to genocide. And yet, he argues that social identities aren’t something we can simply do away with. They can usher in moral progress and bring significance to our lives by connecting the small scale of our daily existence with larger movements, causes, and concerns. Elaborating a bold and clarifying new theory of identity, The Lies That Bind is a ringing philosophical statement for the anxious, conflict-ridden twenty-first century. This book will transform the way we think about who—and what—“we” are.

Race Colour and the Processes of Racialization

Race  Colour and the Processes of Racialization
Author: Farhad Dalal
Release: 2013-05-13
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 264
ISBN: 9781134945429
Language: en
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Is racial conflict determined by biology or society? So many conflicts appear to be caused by racial and ethnic differences; for example, the cities of Britain and America are regularly affected by race riots. It is argued by socio-biologists and some schools of psychoanalysis that our instincts are programmed to hate those different to us by evolutionary and developmental mechanisms. This book argues against this line, proposing an alternative drawing on insights from diverse disciplines including anthropology, social psychology and linguistics, to give power-relations a critical explanatory role in the generation of hatreds. Farhad Dalal argues that people differentiate between races in order to make a distinction between the 'haves' and 'must-not-haves', and that this process is cognitive, emotional and political rather than biological. Examining the subject over the past thousand years, Race, Colour and the Processes of Racialisation covers: * psychoanalytic and other theories of racism * a new theorisation of racism based on group analytic theory * a general theory of difference based on the works of Fanon, Elias, Matte-Blanco and Foulkes * application of this theory to race and racism. Farhad Dalal concludes that the structures of society are reflected in the structures of the psyche, and both of these are colour coded. This book will be invaluable to students, academics and practitioners in the areas of psychoanalysis, group analysis, psychotherapy and counselling.

Diversity in Disney Films

Diversity in Disney Films
Author: Johnson Cheu
Release: 2013-01-10
Editor: McFarland
Pages: 315
ISBN: 9780786446018
Language: en
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"This essay collection gathers recent scholarship on representations of diversity in Disney and Disney/Pixar films, exploring not only race and gender, but also newer areas of study. Covering a wide array of films this compendium highlights the social impact of the entertainment giant and reveals its cultural significance in shaping our global citizenry"--Provided by publisher.

Life on the Color Line

Life on the Color Line
Author: Gregory Howard Williams
Release: 1996-02-01
Editor: Penguin
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9781440673337
Language: en
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“Heartbreaking and uplifting… a searing book about race and prejudice in America… brims with insights that only someone who has lived on both sides of the racial divide could gain.”—Cleveland Plain Dealer “A triumph of storytelling as well as a triumph of spirit.”—Alex Kotlowitz, award-winning author of There Are No Children Here As a child in 1950s segregated Virginia, Gregory Howard Williams grew up believing he was white. But when the family business failed and his parents’ marriage fell apart, Williams discovered that his dark-skinned father, who had been passing as Italian-American, was half black. The family split up, and Greg, his younger brother, and their father moved to Muncie, Indiana, where the young boys learned the truth about their heritage. Overnight, Greg Williams became black. In this extraordinary and powerful memoir, Williams recounts his remarkable journey along the color line and illuminates the contrasts between the black and white worlds: one of privilege, opportunity and comfort, the other of deprivation, repression, and struggle. He tells of the hostility and prejudice he encountered all too often, from both blacks and whites, and the surprising moments of encouragement and acceptance he found from each. Life on the Color Line is a uniquely important book. It is a wonderfully inspiring testament of purpose, perseverance, and human triumph. Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize

Reproducing Racism

Reproducing Racism
Author: Wendy Leo Moore
Release: 2008
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
Pages: 199
ISBN: 0742560066
Language: en
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Law schools serve as gateway institutions into one of the most politically powerful social fields the profession of law. iReproducing Racismi is an examination of white privilege and power in two elite United States law schools. Moore shows how institutions are made white by examining how racial structures, racialized everyday practices, and racial discourses actually function in law schools.

Caste Oprah s Book Club

Caste  Oprah s Book Club
Author: Isabel Wilkerson
Release: 2020-08-04
Editor: Random House
Pages: 496
ISBN: 9780593230268
Language: en
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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • NATIONAL BOOK AWARD LONGLIST • “An instant American classic and almost certainly the keynote nonfiction book of the American century thus far.”—Dwight Garner, The New York Times The Pulitzer Prize–winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions. NAMED THE #1 NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR BY TIME, ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY People • The Washington Post • Publishers Weekly AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • O: The Oprah Magazine • NPR • Bloomberg • Christian Science Monitor • New York Post • The New York Public Library • Fortune • Smithsonian Magazine • Marie Claire • Town & Country • Slate • Library Journal • Kirkus Reviews • LibraryReads • PopMatters Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize • National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist • Dayton Literary Peace Prize Finalist • PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction Finalist • PEN/Jean Stein Book Award Longlist “As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power—which groups have it and which do not.” In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings. Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people’s lives and behavior and the nation’s fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people—including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball’s Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others—she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. Beautifully written, original, and revealing, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.

Rethinking Race

Rethinking Race
Author: Michael O. Hardimon
Release: 2017-06-12
Editor: Harvard University Press
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780674975668
Language: en
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Because science has shown that racial essentialism is false, and because the idea of race has proved virulent, many people believe we should eliminate the word and concept entirely. Michael Hardimon criticizes this thinking, arguing that we must recognize the real ways in which race exists in order to revise our understanding of its significance.

Getting Real About Race

Getting Real About Race
Author: Stephanie M. McClure,Cherise A. Harris
Release: 2017-08-24
Editor: SAGE Publications
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9781506339320
Language: en
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Getting Real About Race is an edited collection of short essays that address the most common stereotypes and misconceptions about race held by students, and by many in the United States, in general.

Statistical Rethinking

Statistical Rethinking
Author: Richard McElreath
Release: 2018-01-03
Editor: CRC Press
Pages: 487
ISBN: 9781315362618
Language: en
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Statistical Rethinking: A Bayesian Course with Examples in R and Stan builds readers’ knowledge of and confidence in statistical modeling. Reflecting the need for even minor programming in today’s model-based statistics, the book pushes readers to perform step-by-step calculations that are usually automated. This unique computational approach ensures that readers understand enough of the details to make reasonable choices and interpretations in their own modeling work. The text presents generalized linear multilevel models from a Bayesian perspective, relying on a simple logical interpretation of Bayesian probability and maximum entropy. It covers from the basics of regression to multilevel models. The author also discusses measurement error, missing data, and Gaussian process models for spatial and network autocorrelation. By using complete R code examples throughout, this book provides a practical foundation for performing statistical inference. Designed for both PhD students and seasoned professionals in the natural and social sciences, it prepares them for more advanced or specialized statistical modeling. Web Resource The book is accompanied by an R package (rethinking) that is available on the author’s website and GitHub. The two core functions (map and map2stan) of this package allow a variety of statistical models to be constructed from standard model formulas.

Diversity and Society

Diversity and Society
Author: Joseph F. Healey,Andi Stepnick
Release: 2016-01-27
Editor: SAGE Publications
Pages: 536
ISBN: 9781506333984
Language: en
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Adapted from Joseph F. Healey and Eileen O’Brien’s bestselling Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Class, this brief and accessible text presents a unified sociological frame of reference to help students analyze minority-dominant relations in the U.S. Diversity and Society: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender, Fifth Edition explores the history and contemporary status of racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., including differences between the experiences of minority men and women. In addition, the book includes comparative, cross-national coverage of group relations.

Rethinking Ethnic Studies

Rethinking Ethnic Studies
Author: R. Tolteka Cuauhtin,Miguel Zavala,Christine E. Sleeter,Wayne Au
Release: 2019
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 363
ISBN: 0942961021
Language: en
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As part of a growing nationwide movement to bring Ethnic Studies into K-12 classrooms, Rethinking Ethnic Studies brings together many of the leading teachers, activists, and scholars in this movement to offer examples of Ethnic Studies frameworks, classroom practices, and organizing at the school, district, and statewide levels. Built around core themes of indigeneity, colonization, anti-racism, and activism, Rethinking Ethnic Studies offers vital resources for educators committed to the ongoing struggle for racial justice in our schools.

Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain

Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain
Author: Kate A. Baldwin
Release: 2002-09-26
Editor: Duke University Press
Pages: 359
ISBN: 9780822383833
Language: en
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Examining the significant influence of the Soviet Union on the work of four major African American authors—and on twentieth-century American debates about race—Beyond the Color Line and the Iron Curtain remaps black modernism, revealing the importance of the Soviet experience in the formation of a black transnationalism. Langston Hughes, W. E. B. Du Bois, Claude McKay, and Paul Robeson each lived or traveled extensively in the Soviet Union between the 1920s and the 1960s, and each reflected on Communism and Soviet life in works that have been largely unavailable, overlooked, or understudied. Kate A. Baldwin takes up these writings, as well as considerable material from Soviet sources—including articles in Pravda and Ogonek, political cartoons, Russian translations of unpublished manuscripts now lost, and mistranslations of major texts—to consider how these writers influenced and were influenced by both Soviet and American culture. Her work demonstrates how the construction of a new Soviet citizen attracted African Americans to the Soviet Union, where they could explore a national identity putatively free of class, gender, and racial biases. While Hughes and McKay later renounced their affiliations with the Soviet Union, Baldwin shows how, in different ways, both Hughes and McKay, as well as Du Bois and Robeson, used their encounters with the U. S. S. R. and Soviet models to rethink the exclusionary practices of citizenship and national belonging in the United States, and to move toward an internationalism that was a dynamic mix of antiracism, anticolonialism, social democracy, and international socialism. Recovering what Baldwin terms the "Soviet archive of Black America," this book forces a rereading of some of the most important African American writers and of the transnational circuits of black modernism.

Renewing Black Intellectual History

Renewing Black Intellectual History
Author: Adolph Reed,Kenneth W. Warren
Release: 2015-11-17
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781317252955
Language: en
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Reflecting critically on the discipline of African American studies is a complicated undertaking. Making sense of the black American experience requires situating it within the larger cultural, political-economic, and ideological dynamics that shape American life. This volume moves away from privileging racial commonality as the fulcrum of inquiry and moves toward observing the quality of the accounts scholars have rendered of black American life. This book maps the changing conditions of black political practice and experience from Emancipation to Obama with excursions into the Jim Crow era, Black Power radicalism, and the Reagan revolt. Here are essays, classic and new, that define historically and conceptually discrete problems affecting black Americans as these problems have been shaped by both politics and scholarly fashion. A key goal of the book is to come to terms with the changing terrain of American life in view of major Civil Rights court decisions and legislation.