The Somme

The Somme
Author: Peter Hart
Release: 2008
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 589
ISBN: STANFORD:36105131673381
Language: en
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Traces the harrowing 1916 "Big Push" confrontation between English, French, and German forces during which the British lost more than twenty thousand soldiers in the first day, in a narrative account drawn from letters, diaries, and first-person testimonies. 10,000 first printing.

Forgotten Voices of the Somme

Forgotten Voices of the Somme
Author: Joshua Levine
Release: 2008-12-02
Editor: Random House
Pages: 304
ISBN: 9781407025520
Language: en
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1916. The Somme. With over a million casualties, it was the most brutal battle of World War I. It is a clash that even now, over 90 years later, remains seared into the national consciousness, conjuring up images of muddy trenches and young lives tragically wasted. Its first day, July 1st 1916 - on which the British suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 dead - is the bloodiest day in the history of the British armed forces to date. On the German side, an officer famously described it as 'the muddy grave of the German field army'. By the end of the battle, the British had learned many lessons in modern warfare while the Germans had suffered irreplaceable losses, ultimately laying the foundations for the Allies' final victory on the Western Front. Drawing on a wealth of material from the vast Imperial War Museum Sound Archive, Forgotten Voices of the Somme presents an intimate, poignant, sometimes even bleakly funny insight into life on the front line: from the day-to-day struggle of extraordinary circumstances to the white heat of battle and the constant threat of injury or death. Featuring contributions from soldiers of both sides and of differing backgrounds, ranks and roles, many of them previously unpublished, this is the definitive oral history of this unique and terrible conflict.

Walking the Somme

Walking the Somme
Author: Paul Reed
Release: 2011-01-01
Editor: Casemate Publishers
Pages: 246
ISBN: 9781848844735
Language: en
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This new edition of Paul Reed's classic book Walking the Somme is an essential traveling companion for anyone visiting the Somme battlefields of 1916. His book, first published over ten years ago, is the result of a lifetime's research into the battle and the landscape over which it was fought. From Gommecourt, Serre, Beaumont-Hamel and Thiepval to Montauban, High Wood, Delville Wood and Flers, he guides the walker across the major sites associated with the fighting. These are now features of the peaceful Somme countryside. In total there are 16 walks, including a new one tracing the operations around Mametz Wood, and all the original walks have been fully revised and brought up to date. Walking the Somme brings the visitor not only to the places where the armies clashed but to the landscape of monuments, cemeteries and villages that make the Somme battlefield so moving to explore.

Tanks on the Somme

Tanks on the Somme
Author: Trevor Pidgeon
Release: 2010-08-19
Editor: Casemate Publishers
Pages: 176
ISBN: 9781844687909
Language: en
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On 15 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme, tanks - one of the decisive weapons of twentieth-century warfare - were sent into action for the first time. In his previous books Trevor Pidgeon, one of the leading authorities on the early tanks, has told the story of that memorable day, but only now has his account of later tank operations during the Somme battle become available. In this, his last work which was completed shortly before he died, he reconstructs the tank actions that took place between late September and November when the Somme offensive was closed down. His account gives a vivid insight into the actions and experiences of the tank crews, and it shows the appalling dangers they faced as they maneuvered their crude, vulnerable and unreliable machines towards the enemy. His book will be essential reading for anyone who is familiar with his previous studies of the subject and for anyone who wants to follow in the tracks of the tanks as they lumbered across the battlefield nearly 100 years ago.

The First Day on the Somme

The First Day on the Somme
Author: Martin Middlebrook
Release: 2016-03-31
Editor: Penguin Press
Pages: 448
ISBN: 0141981601
Language: en
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"The first day on the Somme was the blackest day of slaughter in the history of the British Army, this is a powerful account of the experiences of soldiers who faced it. On July 1, 1916, a continous line of British soldiers climbed out from the trenches of the Somme into No Man's Land and began to walk slowly towards dug-in German troops armed with machine-guns and defended by thick barbed wire. By the end of that day, as old tactics were met by the reality of modern warfare, there had been more than 60,000 British casualties -- a third of them fatalities. Martin Middlebrook's classic account of the blackest day in the history of the British army draws on official sources, local newspapers, autobiographies, novels and poems from the time. Most importantly, it also takes in the accounts of hundreds of survivors: normal men, many of them volunteers, who found themselves thrown into a scene of unparalleled tragedy and horror. Compelling and intensely moving, it describes the true events behind the sacrifice of a generation of young men -- killed as much by the folly of their commanders as by the bullets"--

Somme

Somme
Author: Hugh Sebag-Montefiore
Release: 2017-11
Editor: Penguin UK
Pages: 645
ISBN: 0141043326
Language: en
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Featuring Newly Discovered Accounts from Around the World. No conflict better encapsulates all that went wrong on the Western Front during World War I than the Battle of the Somme in 1916. The tragic loss of life and stoic endurance by troops who walked towards their death is an iconic image - but this critically-acclaimed bestseller, on the four months of battle, shows the extent to which the Allied armies were in fact able to break through the German front lines again and again. In eight years of research, Hugh Sebag-Montefiore has found extraordinary new material from Australians, New Zealanders, Canadians, and the British - from heartbreaking diaries and letters to hitherto unseen Red Cross files - recounting their experiences amid the horror of war. It has been hailed as the best book about the battle, which, though not an Allied victory, was the beginning of the slide towards German defeat.

The Face Of Battle

The Face Of Battle
Author: John Keegan
Release: 2011-08-31
Editor: Random House
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781446496824
Language: en
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The Face of Battle is military history from the battlefield: an imperishable account of the direct experience of individuals at 'the point of maximum danger'. It examines the physical conditions of fighting, the particular emotions and behaviour generated by battle, as well as the motives that impel soldiers to stand and fight rather than run away. In this stunningly vivid reassessment of three battles, John Keegan conveys their reality for the participants, whether facing the arrow cloud of Agincourt, the levelled muskets of Waterloo or the steel rain of the Somme.

The Missing of the Somme

The Missing of the Somme
Author: Geoff Dyer
Release: 2011
Editor: Vintage
Pages: 157
ISBN: 9780307742971
Language: en
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A U.S. release of a classic memoir by the author of Yoga for People Who Can't Be Bothered to Do It weighs the significance of World War I as it is reflected in memories, works of art, cemeteries and traditions that illuminate humanity's understanding of and relationship to the conflict. Original.

The Somme

The Somme
Author: Richard van Emden
Release: 2016-03-31
Editor: Pen and Sword
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781473855229
Language: en
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The offensive on the Somme took place between July and November 1916 and is perhaps the most iconic battle of the Great War. It was there that Kitcheners famous Pals Battalions were first sent into action en masse and it was a battlefield where many of the dreams and aspirations of a nation, hopeful of victory, were agonizingly dashed. Because of its legendary status, the Somme has been the subject of many books, and many more will come out next year. However, nothing has ever been published on the Battle in which the soldiers own photographs have been used to illustrate both the campaigns extraordinary comradeship and its carnage.

Retreat and Rearguard Somme 1918

Retreat and Rearguard  Somme 1918
Author: Jerry Murland
Release: 2014-07-09
Editor: Pen and Sword
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9781781592670
Language: en
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The German Spring offensive or Kaiserschlacht was a period of great danger for the Allies. Both sides were exhausted after years of bitter fighting and huge losses. While eventually catastrophically unsuccessful and the prelude to their final defeat, the Germans forced the Allies back over hard-won ground until the tide turned.??Historian Jerry Murland has researched and visited the scenes of desperate actions during late March 1918. He describes in graphic detail the battles fought by British, Irish and South African regiments in the area from St Leger in the North to La Fere in the South. He unearths the extraordinary stories of unit and individual courage. He also examines the work of the Royal Engineers who blew bridges and disrupted lines of communication. ??This original approach covers battles that in many cases have only been described briefly in official histories. The book is a useful companion for any battlefield visitor.

Somme

Somme
Author: Alexandra Churchill,Andrew Holmes
Release: 2016-05-31
Editor: History Press
Pages: 240
ISBN: 0750965320
Language: en
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The Battle of the Somme was one of the costliest campaigns of the First World War, with tens of thousands of casualties on both sides, drawn from all corners of the world. To describe each day of the battle, 141 fallen casualties have been chosen and through their eyes the full scope of the horror of the Somme emerges. The poignancy of their personal tragedies reminds us of the great sacrifices made by ordinary men in this war to end all wars. ALEXANDRA CHURCHILL is an author, researcher and historian who has contributed to and appeared on numerous television documentaries, including Timewatch (BBC2), Fighting the Red Baron (Channel 4) and Titanic with Len Goodman (BBC1). Her first book, the critically acclaimed Blood and Thunder: The Boys of Eton College and the First World War, was published in 2014. Her second book, Over Land and Sea: Chelsea FC in the Great War (2015), was her first collaboration with Andrew Holmes. ANDREW HOLMES is a researcher and photographer who has been visiting the battlefields of the Great War for over twelve years. He collaborated with Alexandra Churchill on Over Land and Sea: Chelsea FC in the Great War (2015).

The Somme

The Somme
Author: Gary Sheffield
Release: 2015-10-08
Editor: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9781474603096
Language: en
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On 1 July 1916, after a stupendous seven-day artillery preparation, the British Army finally launched its attack on the German line around the River Somme. Over the next four and half months they continued to attack, with little or no gain, and with horrendous losses to both sides. This book, written by the world's foremost expert in the subject, describes in chilling detail everything from the grand strategy to the experience of the men on the ground. Illustrated throughout, it is a stunning and absorbing depiction of the horror that was the Somme in 1916.

The Somme Including Also The Coward

The Somme  Including Also The Coward
Author: Arthur Donald Gristwood
Release: 2006
Editor: Univ of South Carolina Press
Pages: 189
ISBN: 1570036489
Language: en
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In these stories, the heroics of war and noble self-sacrifice are completely absent; replaced by the gritty realism of life in WWI for the ordinary soldier, and the unflinching portrayal of the horrors of war. Written under the guidance of the master storyteller H. G. Wells, they are classics of the genre. 'The Somme' revolves around a futile attack in 1916 during the Somme campaign. Everitt, who is wounded and moved back through a series of dressing stations to the General Hospital at Rouen. Both in and out of the line he behaves selfishly and unheroically, but in a manner with which it is hard for the reader not to identify. Based on A D Gristwood's own wartime experiences, critics have said that few other accounts of the war give such an accurate picture of trench life. 'The Coward' concerns a man who shoots himself in the hand to escape the war, during the March 1918 retreat - an offense punishable by death.

Somme Mud

Somme Mud
Author: E.P.F. Lynch
Release: 2010-05-01
Editor: Random House Australia
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781864715217
Language: en
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Written with dignity, candour and surprising wit, this soldier’s story of the horror of the Western Front trenches is a testament to the power of the human spirit. It's the end of the 1916 winter and the conditions are almost unbelievable. We live in a world of Somme mud. We sleep in it, work in it, fight in it, wade in it and many of us die in it. We see it, feel it, eat it and curse it, but we can't escape it, not even by dying. Somme Mud tells of the devastating experiences of Edward Lynch, a young Australian private (18 when he enlisted) during the First World War when he served with the 45th battalion of the Australian Infantry Forces on the Western Front at the Somme, which saw the most bloody and costly fighting of the war. In just eight weeks, there were 23,000 Australian casualties. The original edition of twenty chapters, was written in pencil in twenty school exercise books in 1921, probably to help exorcise the horrendous experiences Private Lynch had witnessed during his three years at war from mid-1916 until his repatriation home in mid-1919. Lynch had been wounded three times, once seriously and spent over six months in hospital in England. Somme Mud is a precious find, a discovered treasure that vividly captures the magnitude of war through the day-to-day experiences of an ordinary infantryman. From his first day setting sail for France as the band played 'Boys of the Dardanelles' and the crowd proudly waved their fresh-faced boys off, to the harsh reality of the trenches of France and its pale-faced weary men, Lynch captures the essence and contradictions of war. Somme Mud is Australia's version of All Quiet on the Western Front. Told with dignity, candour and surprising wit, it is a testament to the power of the human spirit, a moving true story of humanity and friendship.

Twelve Days on the Somme

Twelve Days on the Somme
Author: Sidney Rogerson
Release: 2009-07-19
Editor: Frontline Books
Pages: 160
ISBN: 9781848325340
Language: en
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A joint operation between Britain and France in 1916, the Battle of the Somme was an attempt to gain territory and dent Germany’s military strength. By the end of the action, very little ground had been won: the Allied Forces had made just 12 km. For this slight gain, more than a million lives were lost. There were more than 400,000 British, 200,000 French, and 500,000 German casualties during the fighting. Twelve Days on the Somme is a memoir of the last spell of front-line duty performed by the 2nd Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment. Written by Sidney Rogerson, a young officer in B Company, it gives an extraordinarily frank and often moving account of what it was really like to fight through one of the most notorious battles of the First World War. Its special message, however, is that, contrary to received assumptions and the popular works of writers like Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, men could face up to the terrible ordeal such a battle presented with resilience, good humour and without loss of morale. This is a classic work whose reprinting is long overdue. This edition includes a new Introduction by Malcolm Brown and a Foreword by Rogerson’s son Commander Jeremy Rogerson.

The First Day on the Somme

The First Day on the Somme
Author: Martin Middlebrook
Release: 2016-06-30
Editor: Pen and Sword
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9781473877184
Language: en
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A history of the British Army’s experience at the Battle of the Somme in France during World War I. After an immense but useless bombardment, at 7:30 AM on July 1, 1916, the British Army went over the top and attacked the German trenches. It was the first day of the battle of the Somme, and on that day, the British suffered nearly 60,000 casualties, two for every yard of their front. With more than fifty times the daily losses at El Alamein and fifteen times the British casualties on D-day, July 1, 1916, was the blackest day in the history of the British Army. But, more than that, as Lloyd George recognized, it was a watershed in the history of the First World War. The Army that attacked on that day was the volunteer Army that had answered Kitchener’s call. It had gone into action confident of a decisive victory. But by sunset on the first day on the Somme, no one could any longer think of a war that might be won. Martin Middlebrook’s research has covered not just official and regimental histories and tours of the battlefields, but interviews with hundreds of survivors, both British and German. As to the action itself, he conveys the overall strategic view and the terrifying reality that it was for front-line soldiers. Revised in 2016 from the 1971 original edition. Praise for The First Day on the Somme “The remembrance of those lives, difficult as it may be, will start in earnest now, with this wonderful book. It’s almost like being there yourself... enough said.”—Books Monthly (UK)

The Somme 1916

The Somme 1916
Author: David O'Mara
Release: 2018-01-22
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 208
ISBN: 147389770X
Language: en
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With a few notable exceptions, the French efforts on the Somme have been largely missing or minimized in British accounts of the Battle of the Somme. And yet they held this sector of the Front from the outbreak of the war until well into 1915 and, indeed, in parts into 1916. It does not hurt to be reminded that the French army suffered some 200,000 casualties in the 1916 offensive. David O'Mara's book provides an outline narrative describing the arrival of the war on the Somme and some of the notable and quite fierce actions that took place that autumn and, indeed, into December of 1914. Extensive mine warfare was a feature of 1915 and beyond on the Somme; for example under Redan Ridge and before Dompierre and Fay. The French limited offensive at Serre in June 1915 is reasonably well known, but there was fighting elsewhere - for example the Germans launched a short, sharp, limited attack at Frise in January 1916, part of the diversionary action before the Germans launched their ill-fated offensive at Verdun. The book covers the Somme front from Gommecourt, north of the Somme, to Chaulnes, at the southern end of the battle zone of 1916. The reader is taken around key points in various tours. For many British visitors the battlefields south of the Somme will be a revelation; there is much to see, both of cemeteries and memorials, but also substantial traces of the fighting remain on the ground, some of which is accessible to the public. It has always been something of a disgrace that there is so little available, even in French, to educate the public in an accessible written form about the substantial effort made by France's army on the Somme; this book - and subsequent, more detailed volumes to be published in the coming years - will go some way to rectify this. British visitors should be fascinated by the story of these 'forgotten' men of France and the largely unknown part of the Somme battlefield.

The Sixteen Trees of the Somme

The Sixteen Trees of the Somme
Author: Lars Mytting
Release: 2018-10
Editor: MacLehose Press
Pages: 403
ISBN: 0857056069
Language: en
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A family story of epic scale, by the author of NORWEGIAN WOOD and THE BELL IN THE LAKE. "An intricate story about war, family, secrets and,yes, wood ... An engaging, satisfying read" The Times "So cleverly plotted, and it builds up such effortless dramatic momentum as it zeroes in on its conclusion" Scotsman Edvard grows up on a remote mountain farmstead in Norway with his taciturn grandfather, Sverre. The death of his parents, when he was three years old, has always been shrouded in mystery - he has never been told how or where it took place and has only a distant memory of his mother. But he knows that the fate of his grandfather's brother, Einar, is somehow bound up with this mystery. One day a coffin is delivered for his grandfather long before his death - a meticulous, beautiful piece of craftsmanship. Perhaps Einar is not dead after all. Edvard's desperate quest to unlock the family's tragic secrets takes him on a long journey - from Norway to the Shetlands, and to the battlefields of France - to the discovery of a very unusual inheritance. The Sixteen Trees of the Somme is about the love of wood and finding your own self, a beautifully intricate and moving tale that spans an entire century. A TIMES BESTSELLER Mytting's book is as much a romantic historical thriller as it is a book of promise, a page-turner as it is a reflective journey into selfhood, history, life's meaning and individual moral responsibility - Mika Provata-Carlone, Bookanista Translated from the Norwegian by Paul Russell Garrett

Britain and a Widening War 1915 1916

Britain and a Widening War  1915   1916
Author: Peter Liddle
Release: 2016-11-30
Editor: Pen and Sword
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781473867192
Language: en
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In a series of concise, thought-provoking chapters the authors summarize and make accessible the latest scholarship on the middle years of the Great War 1915 and 1916 and cover fundamental issues that are rarely explored outside the specialist journals. Their work is an important contribution to advancing understanding of Britains role in the war, and it will be essential reading for anyone who is keen to keep up with the fresh research and original interpretation that is transforming our insight into the impact of the global conflict. The principal battles and campaigns are reconsidered from a new perspective, but so are more general topics such as military leadership, the discord between Britains politicians and generals, conscientious objection and the part played by the Indian Army. The longer-term effects of the war are also considered facial reconstruction, developments in communication, female support for men on active service, grief and bereavement, the challenge to religious belief, battlefield art, and the surviving vestiges of the war. Peter Liddle and his fellow contributors have compiled a volume that will come to be seen as a landmark in the field. Contributors: Andrew BamjiClive BarrettNick BosanquetJames CookeEmily GlassGraeme GoodayAdrian GregoryAndrea HetheringtonRobert JohnsonSpencer JonesPeter LiddleJuliet MacdonaldJessica MeyerDavid MillichopeNS NashWilliam PhilpottJames PughDuncan RedfordNicholas SaundersGary SheffieldJack SheldonJohn SpencerKapil Subramanian

The Battle of the Somme

The Battle of the Somme
Author: Alan Axelrod
Release: 2016-10-03
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
Pages: 291
ISBN: 9781493022090
Language: en
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offensive to be waged against Germany even as France poured incredible numbers of men into the slaughterhouse that was the desperate defense of Verdun. élan vital” of the French people, a quality, he argued, that set the Gallic race apart from the rest of the world. French losses were just under 200,000. The Germans lost at least 650,000. Just as the French refused to give up ground at Verdun, the Germans held on stubbornly at the Somme—so stubbornly that General Ludendorff actually complained that his men “fought too doggedly, clinging too resolutely to the mere holding of ground, with the result that the losses were heavy.” The only thing “conclusive” about the Somme was the ineluctable fact of death. No battle ever fought in any conflict provided a stronger incentive for all sides to reach a negotiated peace—the “peace without victory” that Woodrow Wilson, still standing on the sidelines, urged the combatants to agree upon. Instead, the Kaiser, appalled both by Verdun and the Somme, relieved Falkenhayn and replaced him with Hindenburg and Ludendorff, who had achieved great success on the Eastern Front. The new commanders created two new defensive lines, both well behind the Somme front. On the one hand, it was a retreat. On the other, it was a commitment to draw the French and British farther east and invite them to sacrifice more of their soldiery. The modest advance the British made was but the prelude to additional slaughter.