The Apache Wars

The Apache Wars
Author: Paul Andrew Hutton
Release: 2016
Editor: Broadway Books
Pages: 514
ISBN: 9780770435837
Language: en
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"Originally published in hardcover in slightly different form in the United States by Crown ... in 2016"--Title page verso.

The Apache Wars

The Apache Wars
Author: Joseph C. Jastrzembski
Release: 2009-01-01
Editor: Infobase Publishing
Pages: 133
ISBN: 9781438103907
Language: en
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The Apache are perhaps most noted for such fierce leaders as Cochise and Geronimo. Their name, which comes from the Yuma Indian word for fighting men, bears that out. The Apache tribe is composed of six regional groups - Western Apache, Chiricahua, Mescalero, Jicarilla, Lipan, and Kiowa Apache.

Indeh

Indeh
Author: Ethan Hawke
Release: 2016-06-07
Editor: Grand Central Publishing
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781455564101
Language: en
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The year is 1872. The place, the Apache nations, a region torn apart by decades of war. The people, like Goyahkla, lose his family and everything he loves. After having a vision, the young Goyahkla approaches the Apache leader Cochise, and the entire Apache nation, to lead an attack against the Mexican village of Azripe. It is this wild display of courage that transforms the young brave Goyakhla into the Native American hero Geronimo. But the war wages on. As they battle their enemies, lose loved ones, and desperately cling on to their land and culture, they would utter, "Indeh," or "the dead." When it looks like lasting peace has been reached, it seems like the war is over. Or is it? Indeh captures the deeply rich narrative of two nations at war-as told through the eyes of Naiches and Geronimo-who then try to find peace and forgiveness. Indeh not only paints a picture of some of the most magnificent characters in the history of our country, but it also reveals the spiritual and emotional cost of the Apache Wars. Based on exhaustive research, Indeh offers a remarkable glimpse into the raw themes of cultural differences, the horrors of war, the search for peace, and, ultimately, retribution. The Apache left an indelible mark on our perceptions about the American West, and Indeh shows us why.

ONCE THEY MOVED LIKE THE WIND COCHISE GERONIMO

ONCE THEY MOVED LIKE THE WIND  COCHISE  GERONIMO
Author: David Roberts
Release: 2011-01-11
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781451639889
Language: en
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During the westward settlement, for more than twenty years Apache tribes eluded both US and Mexican armies, and by 1886 an estimated 9,000 armed men were in pursuit. Roberts (Deborah: A Wilderness Narrative) presents a moving account of the end of the Indian Wars in the Southwest. He portrays the great Apache leaders—Cochise, Nana, Juh, Geronimo, the woman warrior Lozen—and U.S. generals George Crock and Nelson Miles. Drawing on contemporary American and Mexican sources, he weaves a somber story of treachery and misunderstanding. After Geronimo's surrender in 1886, the Apaches were sent to Florida, then to Alabama where many succumbed to malaria, tuberculosis and malnutrition and finally in 1894 to Oklahoma, remaining prisoners of war until 1913. The book is history at its most engrossing. —Publishers Weekly

Geronimo and the End of the Apache Wars

Geronimo and the End of the Apache Wars
Author: Charles Leland Sonnichsen
Release: 1990-01-01
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
Pages: 136
ISBN: 0803291981
Language: en
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After prolonged resistance against tremendous odds, Geronimo, the Apache shaman and war leader, and Naiche, the hereditary Chiricahua chief, surrendered to General Nelson A. Miles near the Mexican border on September 4, 1886. It was the beginning of a new day for white settlers in the Southwest and of bitter exile for the Indians. In Geronimo and the End of the Apache Wars Lieutenant Charles B. Gatewood, an emissary of General Miles, describes in vivid circumstantial detail his role in the final capture of Geronimo at Skeleton Canyon. Gatewood offers many intimate glimpses of the Apache chief in an important account published for the first time in this collection. Another first-person narration is by Samuel E. Kenoi, who was ten years old when Geronimo went on his last warpath. A Chiricahua Apache, Kenoi recalls the removal of his people to Florida after the surrender. In other colorful chapters Edwin R. Sweeney writes about the 1851 raid of the Mexican army that killed Geronmio's mother, wife, and children; and Albert E. Wratten relates the life of his father, George Wratten, a government scout, superintendent on three reservations, and defender of the rights of the Apaches.

From Cochise to Geronimo

From Cochise to Geronimo
Author: Edwin R. Sweeney
Release: 2012-09-04
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
Pages: 640
ISBN: 9780806186511
Language: en
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In the decade after the death of their revered chief Cochise in 1874, the Chiricahua Apaches struggled to survive as a people and their relations with the U.S. government further deteriorated. In From Cochise to Geronimo, Edwin R. Sweeney builds on his previous biographies of Chiricahua leaders Cochise and Mangas Coloradas to offer a definitive history of the turbulent period between Cochise's death and Geronimo's surrender in 1886. Sweeney shows that the cataclysmic events of the 1870s and 1880s stemmed in part from seeds of distrust sown by the American military in 1861 and 1863. In 1876 and 1877, the U.S. government proposed moving the Chiricahuas from their ancestral homelands in New Mexico and Arizona to the San Carlos Reservation. Some made the move, but most refused to go or soon fled the reviled new reservation, viewing the government's concentration policy as continued U.S. perfidy. Bands under the leadership of Victorio and Geronimo went south into the Sierra Madre of Mexico, a redoubt from which they conducted bloody raids on American soil. Sweeney draws on American and Mexican archives, some only recently opened, to offer a balanced account of life on and off the reservation in the 1870s and 1880s. From Cochise to Geronimo details the Chiricahuas' ordeal in maintaining their identity despite forced relocations, disease epidemics, sustained warfare, and confinement. Resigned to accommodation with Americans but intent on preserving their culture, they were determined to survive as a people.

The Earth is Weeping

The Earth is Weeping
Author: Peter Cozzens
Release: 2016
Editor: Vintage
Pages: 544
ISBN: 9780307948182
Language: en
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"With the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional Indian tribal lands, setting off a wide-ranging conflict that would last more than three decades. In an exploration of the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of the modern United States, Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace, and explores the squalid lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies"--Amazon.com.

General Crook and the Apache Wars

General Crook and the Apache Wars
Author: Charles Fletcher Lummis
Release: 1985
Editor: Northland Pub
Pages: 148
ISBN: 0873583876
Language: en
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In the early spring of 1886 the news of a fresh Apache outbreak in Arizona Territory burst from the pages of the newspapers of the United States. Preacher's son, cross-country hiker, ex-Harvard scholar-- and newly appointed city editor of the Los Angeles Times-- Charles F. Lummis was overjoyed to be sent to the front. There he found himself the only newspaper correspondent, and there he found that previous news stories had come from anyone and everyone-- everyone except on-the-spot observers. The dispatches of Lummis to the Times cover the Army's campaign against the renegade Apaches under Nanay, Chihuahua and, most publicized, Geronimo. They present that always-present and often deadly enemy, the rugged terrain of the Southwest itself. There are stories of background information on the Apaches and the outbreak and others on history and tactics of the Army's two redoubtable leaders, General Crook and General Miles. And these dispatches (not surprisingly to those who know the writings of Charles F. Lummis) read today as vividly, as excitingly and as humorously as they did during the turbulent days, three-quarters of a century ago, when they were written -- Book jacket.

Apache Wars

Apache Wars
Author: Ernest Lisle Reedstrom
Release: 1992
Editor: Sterling Publishing Company Incorporated
Pages: 256
ISBN: UOM:39015034035447
Language: en
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Narrative following the Apache tribe from their glory days in battle dress, to their defeat and degradation. This study combines text, paintings and rare photographs. --Amazon.com.

The Apache Wars

The Apache Wars
Author: Charles River Charles River Editors,Sean McLachlan
Release: 2015-04-24
Editor: CreateSpace
Pages: 46
ISBN: 1511871660
Language: en
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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting described by American soldiers *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Even if we should be able to dislodge them from the rough mountain ridges and impenetrable woods which cover the immense territories of these frontiers, they would seek better asylum in the vastness of the Sierra Madre. . . [They] know how to surprise and destroy our troops in the mountains and on the plains. They are not ignorant of the use and power of our arms; they manage their own with dexterity; and they are as good or better horsemen than the Spaniards, and having no towns, castles, or temples to defend they may only be attacked in their dispersed and movable rancherias." - Bernardo de Galvez, Instructions for Governing the Interior Provinces of New Spain, 1787 (The Quivera Society, Berkeley) The Apache of the American Southwest have achieved almost legendary status for their fierceness and their tenacity in fighting the U.S. Army. Names like Nana, Cochise, and Geronimo are synonymous with bravery and daring, and the tribe had that reputation long before the Americans arrived. Indeed, among all the Native American tribes, the Spanish, Mexicans, and Americans learned the hard way that the warriors of the Apache were perhaps the fiercest in North America. Based in the Southwest, the Apache fought all three in Mexico and the American Southwest, engaging in seasonal raids for so many centuries that the Apache struck fear into the hearts of all their neighbors. Given the group's reputation, it's fitting that they are inextricably associated with one of their most famous leaders, Geronimo. Descendants of people killed by "hostile" Apache certainly considered warriors like Geronimo to be murderers and thieves whose cultures and societies held no redeeming values, and even today, many Americans associate the name Geronimo with a war cry. The name Geronimo actually came about because of a battle he fought against the Mexicans. Over time, however, the historical perception of the relationship between America and Native tribes changed drastically. With that, Geronimo was viewed in a far different light, as one of a number of Native American leaders who resisted the U.S. and Mexican governments when settlers began to push onto their traditional homelands. Like the majority of Native American groups, the Apache were eventually vanquished and displaced by America's westward push, and Geronimo became an icon for eluding capture for so long. The Apache Wars: The History and Legacy of the U.S. Army's Campaigns against the Apaches analyzes the history of the campaigns that stretched over decades. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Apache Wars like never before, in no time at all.

The Earth is Weeping

The Earth is Weeping
Author: Peter Cozzens
Release: 2016
Editor: Vintage
Pages: 544
ISBN: 9780307948182
Language: en
Available for:

REVIEWS:

"With the end of the Civil War, the nation recommenced its expansion onto traditional Indian tribal lands, setting off a wide-ranging conflict that would last more than three decades. In an exploration of the wars and negotiations that destroyed tribal ways of life even as they made possible the emergence of the modern United States, Peter Cozzens gives us both sides in comprehensive and singularly intimate detail. He illuminates the encroachment experienced by the tribes and the tribal conflicts over whether to fight or make peace, and explores the squalid lives of soldiers posted to the frontier and the ethical quandaries faced by generals who often sympathized with their native enemies"--Amazon.com.

Apache Wars

Apache Wars
Author: Hourly History
Release: 2021-04-18
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 66
ISBN: 9798721312175
Language: en
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Discover the remarkable history of the Apache Wars...The region known as Apacheria had been fought over for centuries, firstly with the arrival of the Apache from the north, then later with the arrival of the Spanish and, finally, the United States. Events came to a bloody climax in the 1800s in a series of conflicts which became known as the Apache Wars. This is a story spanning decades featuring some almost legendary characters whose names have been celebrated in books, movies, and TV shows ever since -including Geronimo, Cochise, Tom Jeffords, and Kit Carson. It is also the story of a boy, born Mexican, adopted by an Irish-American, and then kidnapped and raised by the Apache who would play a key role in the events of the Apache Wars. Discover a plethora of topics such as The Kidnapping of Felix Telles America Divided, Apache United No Mercy: Carleton's Policy Trouble at San Carlos The End of Geronimo's War The Apache Kid And much more! So if you want a concise and informative book on the Apache Wars, simply scroll up and click the "Buy now" button for instant access!

The Apache Wars

The Apache Wars
Author: Charles River Charles River Editors,Sean McLachlan
Release: 2018-02-04
Editor: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Pages: 94
ISBN: 1985023725
Language: en
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*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the fighting described by American soldiers *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Even if we should be able to dislodge them from the rough mountain ridges and impenetrable woods which cover the immense territories of these frontiers, they would seek better asylum in the vastness of the Sierra Madre. . . [They] know how to surprise and destroy our troops in the mountains and on the plains. They are not ignorant of the use and power of our arms; they manage their own with dexterity; and they are as good or better horsemen than the Spaniards, and having no towns, castles, or temples to defend they may only be attacked in their dispersed and movable rancherias." - Bernardo de Galvez, Instructions for Governing the Interior Provinces of New Spain, 1787 (The Quivera Society, Berkeley) The Apache of the American Southwest have achieved almost legendary status for their fierceness and their tenacity in fighting the U.S. Army. Names like Nana, Cochise, and Geronimo are synonymous with bravery and daring, and the tribe had that reputation long before the Americans arrived. Indeed, among all the Native American tribes, the Spanish, Mexicans, and Americans learned the hard way that the warriors of the Apache were perhaps the fiercest in North America. Based in the Southwest, the Apache fought all three in Mexico and the American Southwest, engaging in seasonal raids for so many centuries that the Apache struck fear into the hearts of all their neighbors. Given the group's reputation, it's fitting that they are inextricably associated with one of their most famous leaders, Geronimo. Descendants of people killed by "hostile" Apache certainly considered warriors like Geronimo to be murderers and thieves whose cultures and societies held no redeeming values, and even today, many Americans associate the name Geronimo with a war cry. The name Geronimo actually came about because of a battle he fought against the Mexicans. Over time, however, the historical perception of the relationship between America and Native tribes changed drastically. With that, Geronimo was viewed in a far different light, as one of a number of Native American leaders who resisted the U.S. and Mexican governments when settlers began to push onto their traditional homelands. Like the majority of Native American groups, the Apache were eventually vanquished and displaced by America's westward push, and Geronimo became an icon for eluding capture for so long. The Apache Wars: The History and Legacy of the U.S. Army's Campaigns against the Apaches analyzes the history of the campaigns that stretched over decades. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about the Apache Wars like never before, in no time at all.

The Black Legend

The Black Legend
Author: Doug Hocking
Release: 2018-10-01
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
Pages: 328
ISBN: 9781493034468
Language: en
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In 1861, war between the United States and the Chiricahua seemed inevitable. The Apache band lived on a heavily traveled Emigrant and Overland Mail Trail and routinely raided it, organized by their leader, the prudent, not friendly Cochise. When a young boy was kidnapped from his stepfather’s ranch, Lieutenant George Bascom confronted Cochise even though there was no proof that the Chiricahua were responsible. After a series of missteps, Cochise exacted a short-lived revenge. Despite modern accounts based on spurious evidence, Bascom’s performance in a difficult situation was admirable. This book examines the legend and provides a new analysis of Bascom’s and Cochise’s behavior, putting it in the larger context of the Indian Wars that followed the American Civil War.

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee

Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
Author: Dee Brown
Release: 2012-10-23
Editor: Open Road Media
Pages: 494
ISBN: 9781453274149
Language: en
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The “fascinating” #1 New York Times bestseller that awakened the world to the destruction of American Indians in the nineteenth-century West (The Wall Street Journal). First published in 1970, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee generated shockwaves with its frank and heartbreaking depiction of the systematic annihilation of American Indian tribes across the western frontier. In this nonfiction account, Dee Brown focuses on the betrayals, battles, and massacres suffered by American Indians between 1860 and 1890. He tells of the many tribes and their renowned chiefs—from Geronimo to Red Cloud, Sitting Bull to Crazy Horse—who struggled to combat the destruction of their people and culture. Forcefully written and meticulously researched, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee inspired a generation to take a second look at how the West was won. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.

Wars for Empire

Wars for Empire
Author: Janne Lahti
Release: 2017-10-05
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
Pages: 328
ISBN: 9780806159331
Language: en
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After the end of the U.S.-Mexican War in 1848, the Southwest Borderlands remained hotly contested territory. Over following decades, the United States government exerted control in the Southwest by containing, destroying, segregating, and deporting indigenous peoples—in essence conducting an extended military campaign that culminated with the capture of Geronimo and the forced removal of the Chiricahua Apaches in 1886. In this book, Janne Lahti charts these encounters and the cultural differences that shaped them. Wars for Empire offers a new perspective on the conduct, duration, intensity, and ultimate outcome of one of America's longest wars. Centuries of conflict with Spain and Mexico had honed Apache war-making abilities and encouraged a culture based in part on warrior values, from physical prowess and specialized skills to a shared belief in individual effort. In contrast, U.S. military forces lacked sufficient training and had little public support. The splintered, protracted, and ferocious warfare exposed the limitations of the U.S. military and of federal Indian policies, challenging narratives of American supremacy in the West. Lahti maps the ways in which these weaknesses undermined the U.S. advance. He also stresses how various Apache groups reacted differently to the U.S. invasion. Ultimately, new technologies, the expansion of Euro-American settlements, and decades of war and deception ended armed Apache resistance. By comparing competing martial cultures and examining violence in the Southwest, Wars for Empire provides a new understanding of critical decades of American imperial expansion and a moment in the history of settler colonialism with worldwide significance.

A Guide to the Indian Wars of the West

A Guide to the Indian Wars of the West
Author: John Dishon McDermott
Release: 1998-01-01
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
Pages: 205
ISBN: 080328246X
Language: en
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A rich and detailed look at the wars that the United States conducted against its native population from 1860 to 1890 explores the fundamental circumstances of events, investigates the different responses of tribes to the conflict, and much more. Original. UP.

Massacre On The Lordsburg Road

Massacre On The Lordsburg Road
Author: Marc Simmons
Release: 2004-12-06
Editor: Texas A&M University Press
Pages: 270
ISBN: 1585444464
Language: en
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In the spring of 1883 Judge Hamilton C. McComas and his family were attacked by Apaches on a desolate road in New Mexico Territory. The judge and his wife were killed, and their six-year-old son, Charles, was kidnapped. Although America's reaction to the attack was intense and the search for the missing child as highly publicized as the later Lindbergh kidnapping, little was known or understood at the time about why or how the tragedy had occurred. Marc Simmons sheds the first light on the McComas family's fatal path and gives the first complete picture of circumstances surrounding this tragic event. From long-buried fragments, Simmons reconstructs the events of that fateful day, as well as the U.S. Army's first legal "hot pursuit" of an Apache raiding party into Mexico that followed. The puzzle of why a reputably wise and able man would lead his family into such a fatal predicament and the ironic circumstance of young Charles McComas's death at the hands of U.S. troops illustrate that past events were as complex and sometimes as confusing as those today.

Lt Charles Gatewood and His Apache Wars Memoir

Lt  Charles Gatewood and His Apache Wars Memoir
Author: Charles B. Gatewood,Louis Kraft
Release: 2005
Editor: U of Nebraska Press
Pages: 283
ISBN: 9780803227729
Language: en
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"Realizing that he had more experience dealing with Native peoples than other lieutenants serving on the frontier, Gatewood decided to record his experiences. Although he died before he completed his project, the work he left behind remains an important firsthand account of his life as a commander of Apache scouts and as a military commandant of the White Mountain Indian Reservation. Louis Kraft presents Gatewood's previously unpublished account, punctuating it with an introduction, additional text that fills in the gaps in Gatewood's narrative, detailed notes, and an epilogue."--BOOK JACKET.

Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars 1865 1890

Eyewitnesses to the Indian Wars  1865 1890
Author: Peter Cozzens
Release: 2004-12-21
Editor: Stackpole Books
Pages: 544
ISBN: 9780811749534
Language: en
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• Articles by William T. Sherman, James A. Garfield, John Pope, Nelson A. Miles, Elizabeth Custer, and others • Topics include army life on the frontier, Indian scouts, women's experiences, and commanders and their campaigns This is the final installment of a series that seeks to tell the saga of the military struggle for the American West, using the words of the soldiers, noncombatants, and Native Americans who shaped it. To paint as broad and colorful a picture as possible, riveting firsthand materials have been carefully selected from contemporaneous newspapers, magazines, and unpublished manuscripts. A fitting conclusion to the series, this volume offers a more general perspective on the frontier army and its relationship with the Native American residents of the West.