The Cross and the Lynching Tree

The Cross and the Lynching Tree
Author: James H. Cone
Release: 2011
Editor: Orbis Books
Pages: 202
ISBN: 9781608330010
Language: en
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A landmark in the conversation about race and religion in America. "They put him to death by hanging him on a tree." Acts 10:39 The cross and the lynching tree are the two most emotionally charged symbols in the history of the African American community. In this powerful new work, theologian James H. Cone explores these symbols and their interconnection in the history and souls of black folk. Both the cross and the lynching tree represent the worst in human beings and at the same time a thirst for life that refuses to let the worst determine our final meaning. While the lynching tree symbolized white power and "black death," the cross symbolizes divine power and "black life" God overcoming the power of sin and death. For African Americans, the image of Jesus, hung on a tree to die, powerfully grounded their faith that God was with them, even in the suffering of the lynching era. In a work that spans social history, theology, and cultural studies, Cone explores the message of the spirituals and the power of the blues; the passion and of Emmet Till and the engaged vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.; he invokes the spirits of Billie Holliday and Langston Hughes, Fannie Lou Hamer and Ida B. Well, and the witness of black artists, writers, preachers, and fighters for justice. And he remembers the victims, especially the 5,000 who perished during the lynching period. Through their witness he contemplates the greatest challenge of any Christian theology to explain how life can be made meaningful in the face of death and injustice.

The Lynching of Louie Sam

The Lynching of Louie Sam
Author: Elizabeth Stewart
Release: 2012-06
Editor: Annick Press
Pages: 288
ISBN: 155451438X
Language: en
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After Native American Louie Sam is suspected of killing someone, he is chased into Canada and lynched, but teenager George Gillies, a newcomer to Washington Territory, doesn't think Louie was guilty and sets out to investigate.

The Lynching

The Lynching
Author: Laurence Leamer
Release: 2016-06-07
Editor: HarperCollins
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9780062458353
Language: en
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The New York Times bestselling author of The Kennedy Women chronicles the powerful and spellbinding true story of a brutal race-based killing in 1981 and subsequent trials that undid one of the most pernicious organizations in American history—the Ku Klux Klan. On a Friday night in March 1981 Henry Hays and James Knowles scoured the streets of Mobile in their car, hunting for a black man. The young men were members of Klavern 900 of the United Klans of America. They were seeking to retaliate after a largely black jury could not reach a verdict in a trial involving a black man accused of the murder of a white man. The two Klansmen found nineteen-year-old Michael Donald walking home alone. Hays and Knowles abducted him, beat him, cut his throat, and left his body hanging from a tree branch in a racially mixed residential neighborhood. Arrested, charged, and convicted, Hays was sentenced to death—the first time in more than half a century that the state of Alabama sentenced a white man to death for killing a black man. On behalf of Michael’s grieving mother, Morris Dees, the legendary civil rights lawyer and cofounder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, filed a civil suit against the members of the local Klan unit involved and the UKA, the largest Klan organization. Charging them with conspiracy, Dees put the Klan on trial, resulting in a verdict that would level a deadly blow to its organization. Based on numerous interviews and extensive archival research, The Lynching brings to life two dramatic trials, during which the Alabama Klan’s motives and philosophy were exposed for the evil they represent. In addition to telling a gripping and consequential story, Laurence Leamer chronicles the KKK and its activities in the second half the twentieth century, and illuminates its lingering effect on race relations in America today. The Lynching includes sixteen pages of black-and-white photographs.

The Lynching of Emmett Till

The Lynching of Emmett Till
Author: Christopher Metress
Release: 2002
Editor: University of Virginia Press
Pages: 360
ISBN: 0813921228
Language: en
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Uses excerpts from newspapers and editorials and accounts of the murder and trial to examine the lynching of fourteen-year-old Emmett Till in 1955, in a volume which also contains selections from poems, songs, interviews, essays, and memoirs relating to the incident.

The Lynching of Language

The Lynching of Language
Author: Sandra L. Ragan,Professor Emerita in the Department of Communication Sandra L Ragan,Christina Beck,Dianne G. Bystrom,Lynda L. Kaid
Release: 1996
Editor: University of Illinois Press
Pages: 293
ISBN: 0252065174
Language: en
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The Lynching of Mexicans in the Texas Borderlands

The Lynching of Mexicans in the Texas Borderlands
Author: Nicholas Villanueva Jr.
Release: 2017-06-15
Editor: University of New Mexico Press
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780826358394
Language: en
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More than just a civil war, the Mexican Revolution in 1910 triggered hostilities along the border between Mexico and the United States. In particular, the decade following the revolution saw a dramatic rise in the lynching of ethnic Mexicans in Texas. This book argues that ethnic and racial tension brought on by the fighting in the borderland made Anglo-Texans feel justified in their violent actions against Mexicans. They were able to use the legal system to their advantage, and their actions often went unpunished. Villanueva’s work further differentiates the borderland lynching of ethnic Mexicans from the Southern lynching of African Americans by asserting that the former was about citizenship and sovereignty, as many victims’ families had resources to investigate the crimes and thereby place the incidents on an international stage.

Coatesville and the Lynching of Zachariah Walker

Coatesville and the Lynching of Zachariah Walker
Author: Dennis B. Downey,Raymond M. Hyser
Release: 2011-07-06
Editor: Arcadia Publishing
Pages: 160
ISBN: 9781625841032
Language: en
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On a warm August night in 1911, Zachariah Walker was lynched--burned alive--by an angry mob on the outskirts of Coatesville, a prosperous Pennsylvania steel town. At the time of his very public murder, Walker, an African American millworker, was under arrest for the shooting and killing of a respected local police officer. Investigated by the NAACP, the horrific incident garnered national and international attention. Despite this scrutiny, a conspiracy of silence shrouded the events, and the accused men and boys were found not guilty at trial. On the 100th anniversary of the lynching and the 20th anniversary of the book's original release as No Crooked Death, authors Dennis B. Downey and Raymond M. Hyser bring new insight to events that rocked a community.

The Lynching of Cleo Wright

The Lynching of Cleo Wright
Author: Dominic J. Capeci Jr.
Release: 2015-01-13
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9780813156460
Language: en
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On January 20, 1942, black oil mill worker Cleo Wright assaulted a white woman in her home and nearly killed the first police officer who tried to arrest him. An angry mob then hauled Wright out of jail and dragged him through the streets of Sikeston, Missouri, before burning him alive. Wright's death was, unfortunately, not unique in American history, but what his death meant in the larger context of life in the United States in the twentieth-century is an important and compelling story. After the lynching, the U.S. Justice Department was forced to become involved in civil rights concerns for the first time, provoking a national reaction to violence on the home front at a time when the country was battling for democracy in Europe. Dominic Capeci unravels the tragic story of Wright's life on several stages, showing how these acts of violence were indicative not only of racial tension but the clash of the traditional and the modern brought about by the war. Capeci draws from a wide range of archival sources and personal interviews with the participants and spectators to draw vivid portraits of Wright, his victims, law-enforcement officials, and members of the lynch mob. He places Wright in the larger context of southern racial violence and shows the significance of his death in local, state, and national history during the most important crisis of the twentieth-century.

The Lynching of Ladies

The Lynching of Ladies
Author: Jo Ann Mason
Release: 2013-10-01
Editor: Xlibris Corporation
Pages: 246
ISBN: 9781483686332
Language: en
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The Lynching of Ladies is the first in a trilogy of memoirs about two best friends. After experiencing one traumatic experience after another, one dresses herself in tenacity and perseverance and the other in self-loathing and defeat. These ladies experience social, emotional, and physical lynchings throughout their young lives. When Casey tells Arianna, "Men go off to war, women go off to men there are casualties in both," a turning point begins. Both carry the broken pieces of their adolescence into adulthood, with disastrous results . . . until one day a healthy dose of self-esteem saves one of them in a life-altering way. These events do not happen without much wit and laughter. It is written for women who want to stop being the victim and become the victor. This is a self-help primer for women all over the world, regardless of social station or economic background. It is written to help stop "the lynching of ladies!" None of this happens without much wit and laughter.

The Lynching of Louie Sam

The Lynching of Louie Sam
Author: Elizabeth Stewart
Release: 2012-07-03
Editor: Annick Press
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781554514946
Language: en
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Between 1882 and 1968 there were 4,742 lynchings in the United States. In Canada during the same period there was one—the hanging of American Indian Louie Sam. The year is 1884, and 15-year-old George Gillies lives in the Washington Territory, near the border with British Columbia. In this newly settled land, white immigrants have an uneasy relationship with the Native Indians. When George and his siblings discover the murdered body of a local white man, suspicion immediately falls on a young Indian named Louie Sam. George and his best friend, Pete, follow a lynch mob north into Canada, where the terrified boy is seized and hung. But even before the deed is done, George begins to have doubts. Louie Sam was a boy, only 14—could he really be a vicious murderer? Were the mob leaders motivated by justice, or were they hiding their own guilt? As George uncovers the truth—implicating Pete’s father and other prominent locals—tensions in the town rise, and he must face his own part in the tragedy. But standing up for justice has devastating consequences for George and his family. Inspired by the true story of the lynching, recently acknowledged as a historical injustice by Washington State, this powerful novel offers a stark depiction of historical racism and the harshness of settler life. The story will provoke readers to reflect on the dangers of mob mentality and the importance of speaking up for what’s right.

Harlem Shadows

Harlem Shadows
Author: Claude McKay
Release: 2021-08-31
Editor: Open Road Media
Pages: 96
ISBN: 9781504067836
Language: en
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A collection of poetry from the award-winning, Jamaican-American author of Home to Harlem. In Harlem Shadows, poet and writer Claude McKay touches on a variety of themes as he celebrates his Jamaican heritage and sheds light on the Black American experience. While the title poem follows sex workers on the streets of Harlem in New York City, the sight of fruit in a window in “The Tropics of New York” reminds the author of his old life in Jamaica. “If We Must Die” was written in response to the Red Summer of 1919, when Black Americans around the country were attacked by white supremacists. And in “After the Winter,” McKay offers a feeling of hope. Born in Jamaica in 1889, McKay first visited the United States in 1912. He traveled the world and eventually became an American citizen in 1940. His work influenced the likes of James Baldwin and Richard Wright. “One of the great forces in bringing about . . . the Negro literary Renaissance.” —James Weldon Johnson, author of The Autobiography of an Ex–Colored Man “This is [McKay’s] first book of verse to be published in the United States, but it will give him the high place among American poets to which he is rightfully entitled.” —Walter F. White, author of Flight

Lynching and Vigilantism in the United States

Lynching and Vigilantism in the United States
Author: Anonim
Release: 1997
Editor: Greenwood Publishing Group
Pages: 441
ISBN: 0313301778
Language: en
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Filling a void in the history of American collective violence, this bibliography includes over 4,200 works dealing with vigilante movements and lynchings.

Lynching in the West 1850 1935

Lynching in the West  1850 1935
Author: Ken Gonzales-Day
Release: 2006
Editor: Duke University Press
Pages: 299
ISBN: 0822337940
Language: en
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This visual and textual study of lynchings that took place in California between 1850 and 1935 shows that race-based lynching in the United States reached far beyond the South.

The End of American Lynching

The End of American Lynching
Author: Ashraf H. A. Rushdy
Release: 2012-06-18
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Pages: 232
ISBN: 9780813552934
Language: en
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The End of American Lynching questions how we think about the dynamics of lynching, what lynchings mean to the society in which they occur, how lynching is defined, and the circumstances that lead to lynching. Ashraf H. A. Rushdy looks at three lynchings over the course of the twentieth century—one in Coatesville, Pennsylvania, in 1911, one in Marion, Indiana, in 1930, and one in Jasper, Texas, in 1998—to see how Americans developed two distinct ways of thinking and talking about this act before and after the 1930s. One way takes seriously the legal and moral concept of complicity as a way to understand the dynamics of a lynching; this way of thinking can give us new perceptions into the meaning of mobs and the lynching photographs in which we find them. Another way, which developed in the 1940s and continues to influence us today, uses a strategy of denial to claim that lynchings have ended. Rushdy examines how the denial of lynching emerged and developed, providing insight into how and why we talk about lynching the way we do at the dawn of the twenty-first century. In doing so, he forces us to confront our responsibilities as American citizens and as human beings.

Witnessing Lynching

Witnessing Lynching
Author: Anne P. Rice
Release: 2003
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Pages: 324
ISBN: 0813533309
Language: en
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Witnessing Lynching: American Writers Respond is the first anthology to gather poetry, essays, drama, and fiction from the height of the lynching era (1889 1935). During this time, the torture of a black person drew thousands of local onlookers and was replayed throughout the nation in lurid newspaper reports. The selections gathered here represent the courageous efforts of American writers to witness the trauma of lynching and to expose the truth about this uniquely American atrocity. Included are well-known authors and activists such as Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, Ida B. Wells, and Theodore Dreiser, as well as many others. These writers respond to lynching in many different ways, using literature to protest and educate, to create a space of mourning in which to commemorate and rehumanize the dead, and as a cathartic release for personal and collective trauma. Their words provide today s reader with a chance to witness lynching and better understand the current state of race relations in America. An introduction by Anne P. Rice offers a broad historical and thematic framework to ground the selections. "

At the Hands of Persons Unknown

At the Hands of Persons Unknown
Author: Philip Dray
Release: 2007-12-18
Editor: Modern Library
Pages: 544
ISBN: 9780307430663
Language: en
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WINNER OF THE SOUTHERN BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FOR NONFICTION • “A landmark work of unflinching scholarship.”—The New York Times This extraordinary account of lynching in America, by acclaimed civil rights historian Philip Dray, shines a clear, bright light on American history’s darkest stain—illuminating its causes, perpetrators, apologists, and victims. Philip Dray also tells the story of the men and women who led the long and difficult fight to expose and eradicate lynching, including Ida B. Wells, James Weldon Johnson, Walter White, and W.E.B. Du Bois. If lynching is emblematic of what is worst about America, their fight may stand for what is best: the commitment to justice and fairness and the conviction that one individual’s sense of right can suffice to defy the gravest of wrongs. This landmark book follows the trajectory of both forces over American history—and makes lynching’s legacy belong to us all. Praise for At the Hands of Persons Unknown “In this history of lynching in the post-Reconstruction South—the most comprehensive of its kind—the author has written what amounts to a Black Book of American race relations.”—The New Yorker “A powerfully written, admirably perceptive synthesis of the vast literature on lynching. It is the most comprehensive social history of this shameful subject in almost seventy years and should be recognized as a major addition to the bibliography of American race relations.”—David Levering Lewis “An important and courageous book, well written, meticulously researched, and carefully argued.”—The Boston Globe “You don’t really know what lynching was until you read Dray’s ghastly accounts of public butchery and official complicity.”—Time

Legacies of Lynching

Legacies of Lynching
Author: Jonathan Markovitz
Release: 2004
Editor: U of Minnesota Press
Pages: 227
ISBN: 0816639957
Language: en
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Between 1880 and 1930, thousands of African Americans were lynched in the United States. Beyond the horrific violence inflicted on these individuals, lynching terrorized whole communities and became a defining characteristic of Southern race relations in the Jim Crow era. As spectacle, lynching was intended to serve as a symbol of white supremacy. Yet, Jonathan Markovitz notes, the act's symbolic power has endured long after the practice of lynching has largely faded away.Legacies of Lynching examines the evolution of lynching as a symbol of racial hatred and a metaphor for race relations in popular culture, art, literature, and political speech. Markovitz credits the efforts of the antilynching movement with helping to ensure that lynching would be understood not as a method of punishment for black rapists but as a terrorist practice that provided stark evidence of the brutality of Southern racism and as America's most vivid symbol of racial oppression. Cinematic representations of lynching, from Birth of a Nation to Do the Right Thing, he contends, further transform the ways that American audiences remember and understand lynching, as have disturbing recent cases in which alleged or actual acts of racial violence reconfigured stereotypes of black criminality. Markovitz further reveals how lynching imagery has been politicized in contemporary society with the example of Clarence Thomas, who condemned the Senate's investigation into allegations of sexual harassment during his Supreme Court confirmation hearings as a "high-tech lynching."Even today, as revealed by the 1998 dragging death of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas, and the national soul-searching it precipitated, lynching continues to pervade America's collective memory. Markovitz concludes with an analysis of debates about a recent exhibition of photographs of lynchings, suggesting again how lynching as metaphor remains always in the background of our national discussions of race and racial relations.Jonathan Markovitz is a lecturer in sociology at the University of California, San Diego.

Stanly Has a Lynching

Stanly Has a Lynching
Author: M Lynette Hartsell
Release: 2018-09-20
Editor: M. Lynette Hartsell
Pages: 158
ISBN: 9781732354104
Language: en
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"Stanly Has A Lynching" examines the ways in which the media as well as religious, political and social institutions have used ballads, fiction and folklore tales for over a century to celebrate, rather than condemn, the brutal lynching of a white man, Alexander Whitley, in 1892. How men in a small town in North Carolina justified this act of murder as "Just Desert" -- before, during and after the event -- is exposed when facts, rather than fiction, are brought into focus. Through her research and analysis, Ms. Hartsell demonstrates how a family legacy was tainted by a fabricated folktale embedded in religious motif. Many newspaper accounts from the 1800's help tell the story, conveying aspects of southern history and Lynch Culture not often found in textbooks.

Blood Justice

Blood Justice
Author: Howard Smead
Release: 1988
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Pages: 248
ISBN: 0195054296
Language: en
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Reconstructs the case of Mack Charles Parker, a young African-American man who was lynched by a white mob in 1959 after being charged with the rape of a white woman in Poplarville, Mississippi.

The Tragedy of Lynching

The Tragedy of Lynching
Author: Arthur F. Raper
Release: 2017-10-10
Editor: UNC Press Books
Pages: 508
ISBN: 9781469640211
Language: en
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This book deals with the quest for a preventive to lynching which can be undertaken only after one has an understanding of what it is that is to be prevented. This necessary analysis of lynching--its background, circumstances, and meaning--introduces many baffling elements. The author has made a detailed study of the lynchings of 1930 in an effort to find an answer to the complexities of the problem. Originally published in 1933. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.