War and Genocide

War and Genocide
Author: Doris L. Bergen
Release: 2009-02-16
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Pages: 296
ISBN: 9780742557161
Language: en
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In examining one of the defining events of the twentieth century, Doris L. Bergen situates the Holocaust in its historical, political, social, cultural, and military contexts. Unlike many other treatments of the Holocaust, the revised, second edition of War and Genocide discusses not only the persecution of the Jews, but also other segments of society victimized by the Nazis: gypsies, homosexuals, Poles, Soviet POWs, the handicapped, and other groups deemed undesirable. In clear and eloquent prose, Bergen explores the two interconnected goals that drove the Nazi German program of conquest and genocide—purification of the so-called Aryan race and expansion of its living space—and discusses how these goals affected the course of World War II. Including first hand accounts from perpetrators, victims, and eyewitnesses, the book is immediate, human, and eminently readable.

War and Genocide

War and Genocide
Author: Martin Shaw
Release: 2015-01-05
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780745697529
Language: en
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This comprehensive introduction to the study of war and genocide presents a disturbing case that the potential for slaughter is deeply rooted in the political, economic, social and ideological relations of the modern world. Most accounts of war and genocide treat them as separate phenomena. This book thoroughly examines the links between these two most inhuman of human activities. It shows that the generally legitimate business of war and the monstrous crime of genocide are closely related. This is not just because genocide usually occurs in the midst of war, but because genocide is a form of war directed against civilian populations. The book shows how fine the line has been, in modern history, between ‘degenerate war’ involving the mass destruction of civilian populations, and ‘genocide’, the deliberate destruction of civilian groups as such. Written by one of the foremost sociological writers on war, War and Genocide has four main features: an original argument about the meaning and causes of mass killing in the modern world; a guide to the main intellectual resources – military, political and social theories – necessary to understand war and genocide; summaries of the main historical episodes of slaughter, from the trenches of the First World War to the Nazi Holocaust and the killing fields of Cambodia, Bosnia and Rwanda; practical guides to further reading, courses and websites. This book examines war and genocide together with their opposites, peace and justice. It looks at them from the standpoint of victims as well as perpetrators. It is an important book for anyone wanting to understand – and overcome – the continuing salience of destructive forces in modern society.

War and Genocide

War and Genocide
Author: Martin Shaw
Release: 2003-07-09
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Pages: 272
ISBN: 074561907X
Language: en
Available for:

REVIEWS:

This comprehensive introduction to the study of war and genocide presents a disturbing case that the potential for slaughter is deeply rooted in the political, economic, social and ideological relations of the modern world. Most accounts of war and genocide treat them as separate phenomena. This book thoroughly examines the links between these two most inhuman of human activities. It shows that the generally legitimate business of war and the monstrous crime of genocide are closely related. This is not just because genocide usually occurs in the midst of war, but because genocide is a form of war directed against civilian populations. The book shows how fine the line has been, in modern history, between ‘degenerate war’ involving the mass destruction of civilian populations, and ‘genocide’, the deliberate destruction of civilian groups as such. Written by one of the foremost sociological writers on war, War and Genocide has four main features: an original argument about the meaning and causes of mass killing in the modern world; a guide to the main intellectual resources – military, political and social theories – necessary to understand war and genocide; summaries of the main historical episodes of slaughter, from the trenches of the First World War to the Nazi Holocaust and the killing fields of Cambodia, Bosnia and Rwanda; practical guides to further reading, courses and websites. This book examines war and genocide together with their opposites, peace and justice. It looks at them from the standpoint of victims as well as perpetrators. It is an important book for anyone wanting to understand – and overcome – the continuing salience of destructive forces in modern society.

War and Genocide in Cuba 1895 1898

War and Genocide in Cuba  1895 1898
Author: John Lawrence Tone
Release: 2006-12-08
Editor: Univ of North Carolina Press
Pages: 352
ISBN: 9780807877302
Language: en
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From 1895 to 1898, Cuban insurgents fought to free their homeland from Spanish rule. Though often overshadowed by the "Splendid Little War" of the Americans in 1898, according to John Tone, the longer Spanish-Cuban conflict was in fact more remarkable, foreshadowing the wars of decolonization in the twentieth century. Employing newly released evidence--including hospital records, intercepted Cuban letters, battle diaries from both sides, and Spanish administrative records--Tone offers new answers to old questions concerning the war. He examines the origin of Spain's genocidal policy of "reconcentration"; the causes of Spain's military difficulties; the condition, effectiveness, and popularity of the Cuban insurgency; the necessity of American intervention; and Spain's supposed foreknowledge of defeat. The Spanish-Cuban-American war proved pivotal in the histories of all three countries involved. Tone's fresh analysis will provoke new discussions and debates among historians and human rights scholars as they reexamine the war in which the concentration camp was invented, Cuba was born, Spain lost its empire, and America gained an overseas empire.

War and Genocide in South Sudan

War and Genocide in South Sudan
Author: Clémence Pinaud
Release: 2021-02-15
Editor: Cornell University Press
Pages: 330
ISBN: 9781501753015
Language: en
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Using more than a decade's worth of fieldwork in South Sudan, Clémence Pinaud here explores the relationship between predatory wealth accumulation, state formation, and a form of racism—extreme ethnic group entitlement—that has the potential to result in genocide. War and Genocide in South Sudan traces the rise of a predatory state during civil war in southern Sudan and its transformation into a violent Dinka ethnocracy after the region's formal independence. That new state, Pinaud argues, waged genocide against non-Dinka civilians in 2013-2017. During a civil war that wrecked the region between 1983 and 2005, the predominantly Dinka Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA) practiced ethnically exclusive and predatory wealth accumulation. Its actions fostered extreme group entitlement and profoundly shaped the rebel state. Ethnic group entitlement eventually grew into an ideology of ethnic supremacy. After that war ended, the semi-autonomous state turned into a violent and predatory ethnocracy—a process accelerated by independence in 2011. The rise of exclusionary nationalism, a new security landscape, and inter-ethnic political competition contributed to the start of a new round of civil war in 2013, in which the recently founded state unleashed violence against nearly all non-Dinka ethnic groups. Pinaud investigates three campaigns waged by the South Sudan government in 2013–2017 and concludes they were genocidal—they sought to destroy non-Dinka target groups. She demonstrates how the perpetrators' sense of group entitlement culminated in land-grabs that amounted to a genocidal conquest echoing the imperialist origins of modern genocides. Thanks to generous funding from TOME, the ebook editions of this book are available as Open Access volumes from Cornell Open (cornellopen.org) and other repositories.

The Holocaust

The Holocaust
Author: Doris L. Bergen
Release: 2009
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
Pages: 279
ISBN: 0742557146
Language: en
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Documents the historical, political, social, cultural, and military context of the Holocaust, discussing the persecution of the Jews, Gypsies, Soviet prisoners of war, and Polish citizens.

From War to Genocide

From War to Genocide
Author: André Guichaoua
Release: 2015-12
Editor: University of Wisconsin Pres
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9780299298203
Language: en
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In April 1994 Rwanda exploded in violence, with political, social, and economic divisions most visible along ethnic lines of the Hutu and Tutsi factions. The ensuing killings resulted in the deaths of as much as 20 percent of Rwanda's population. André Guichaoua, who was present as the genocide began, unfolds a complex story with multiple actors, including three major political parties that each encompassed a spectrum of positions, all reacting to and influencing a rapidly evolving situation. Economic polarities, famine-fueled privation, clientelism, corruption, north-south rivalries, and events in the neighboring nations of Burundi and Uganda all deepened ethnic tensions, allowing extremists to prevail over moderates. Guichaoua draws on years of meticulous research to describe and analyze this history. He emphasizes that the same virulent controversies that fueled the conflict have often influenced judicial, political, and diplomatic responses to it, reproducing the partisan cleavages between the former belligerents and implicating state actors, international institutions, academics, and the media. Guichaoua insists upon the imperative of absolute intellectual independence in pursuing the truth about some of the gravest human rights violations of the twentieth century.

Voices on War and Genocide

Voices on War and Genocide
Author: Omer Bartov
Release: 2020-06-11
Editor: Berghahn Books
Pages: 456
ISBN: 9781789207194
Language: en
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Taking as its point of departure Omer Bartov’s acclaimed Anatomy of a Genocide, this volume brings together previously unknown accounts by three individuals from Buczacz. These rare narratives give personal glimpses into daily life in unsettled times: a Polish headmaster during World War I, a Ukrainian teacher and witness to both Soviet and German rule, and a Jewish radio technician, genocide survivor, and member of the Polish resistance. Together, they offer a prismatic perspective on a world remote from our own that nonetheless helps us understand how people not unlike ourselves responded to mass violence and destruction.

War of Annihilation

War of Annihilation
Author: Geoffrey P. Megargee
Release: 2007-10-16
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9781461646839
Language: en
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In War of Annihilation, noted military historian Geoffrey P. Megargee provides a clear, concise history of the Germans' opening campaign of conquest and genocide in 1941. By drawing on the best of military and Holocaust scholarship, Megargee dispels the myths that have distorted the role of Germany's military leadership in both the military operations themselves and the unthinkable crimes that were part of them.

Teaching About Rape in War and Genocide

Teaching About Rape in War and Genocide
Author: J. Roth,C. Rittner
Release: 2015-10-29
Editor: Springer
Pages: 115
ISBN: 9781137499165
Language: en
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This edited volume is both a guide for educators and a resource for everyone who wants to strengthen resistance against a major atrocity that besieges human development. Its contributors explore a crucial question: how to teach about rape in war and genocide?

Reparations for Victims of Genocide War Crimes and Crimes Against Humanity

Reparations for Victims of Genocide  War Crimes and Crimes Against Humanity
Author: Carla Ferstman,Mariana Goetz,Alan Stephens
Release: 2009
Editor: BRILL
Pages: 575
ISBN: 9789004174498
Language: en
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This book provides detailed analyses of systems that have been established to provide reparations to victims of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, and the way in which these systems have worked and are working in practice. Many of these systems are described and assessed for the first time in an academic publication. The publication draws upon a groundbreaking Conference organised by the Clemens Nathan Research Centre (CNRC) and REDRESS at the Peace Palace in The Hague, with the support of the Dutch Carnegie Foundation. Both CNRC and REDRESS had become very concerned about the extreme difficulty encountered by most victims of serious international crimes in attempting to access effective and enforceable remedies and reparation for harm suffered. In discussions between the Conference organisers and Judges and officials of the International Criminal Court, it became ever more apparent that there was a great need for frank and open exchanges on the question of effective reparation, between the representatives of victims, of NGOs and IGOs, and other experts. It was clear to all that the many current initiatives of governments and regional and international institutions to afford reparations to victims of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes could benefit greatly by taking into full account the wide and varied practice that had been built up over several decades. In particular, the Hague Conference sought to consider in detail the long experience of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany (the Claims Conference) in respect of Holocaust restitution programmes, as well as the practice of truth commissions, arbitral proceedings and a variety of national processes to identify common trends, best practices and lessons. This book thus explores the actions of governments, as well as of national and international courts and commissions in applying, processing, implementing and enforcing a variety of reparations schemes and awards. Crucially, it considers the entire complex of issues from the perspective of the beneficiaries - survivors and their communities - and from the perspective of the policy-makers and implementers tasked with resolving technical and procedural challenges in bringing to fruition adequate, effective and meaningful reparations in the context of mass victimisation.

Worse Than War

Worse Than War
Author: Daniel Jonah Goldhagen
Release: 2010-01-21
Editor: Hachette UK
Pages: 656
ISBN: 9780748115860
Language: en
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Daniel Jonah Goldhagen has written an original and important study of genocide that reconceives its very nature. He does so not by examining a series of genocides but by exploring the nature of mass killing itself. Our failure to clearly describe, explain, and understand the mechanisms of genocide has made it difficult to prevent, and this book will change that. Through exhaustive research, he brilliantly lays out the roots and motivations of mass slaughter, exploring such questions as: Why do genocides occur? What makes people willing to slaughter others? How do cultural beliefs justify genocide among groups of people? Why has the world been so ineffective in reducing the incidence of genocide? Based on his thoroughgoing reconceptualization of genocide, Goldhagen proposes novel, sensible, and effective measures to put an end to this scourge of humanity, which is worse, even, than war. With the unflinching moral and analytical clarity that he is internationally known for, Goldhagen leaves no stone unturned in this groundbreaking book that will not only transform our understanding of genocide, but every person and political leader who reads it.

Genocide on Trial

Genocide on Trial
Author: Donald Bloxham
Release: 2001
Editor: Oxford University Press
Pages: 273
ISBN: 9780198208723
Language: en
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When the Allies tried German war criminals at the end of WWII they were trying not only to punish the guilty but also to set down a history of Nazism and of what had happened in Europe. Bloxham shows the reality was that these proceeedings failed.

Framing War and Genocide

Framing War and Genocide
Author: Gregory Kent
Release: 2006
Editor: Hampton Press (NJ)
Pages: 485
ISBN: STANFORD:36105114503746
Language: en
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Although just a decade ago, the destruction of a European state and society through war and genocide remains one of the worst global crises of the post Cold War era with reverberations still felt today. Bombardment and sieges of major towns and cities, concentration and death camps, and the mass slaughter and expulsion of civilians were all characteristics of a type of warfare that Europe had never dreamed might return. The war against Bosnia had a major impact on European and wider global consciousness, being as it was then, the most reported, debated and analyzed conflict to date. But despite the extensive coverage of Bosnia the author contends the conflict and its origins were certainly misunderstood, there being a significant gulf between media perspectives and the thrust of academic discourse. This multidisciplinary book is based on extensive research into the TV and newspaper framing of the war during the critical early period of its development. Uniquely the analysis of media is underpinned by an extensive and detailed historical argument about the nature of the wars and the politics of the Federation, including the use of media in war-making strategies in Yugoslavia itself. It will be of interest to scholars of IR and politics, media, communication and journalism studies, and war and genocide studies. Journalists and the general reader will find the book accessible with valuable insights into reporting war and understanding media representation of conflict. Key issues and questions addressed include: the critical use of official sources and propaganda in journalism; how media and policymakers interact to define and frame problems for policy action; what factors limit the accurate reporting of war, what is genocide and how is the Genocide Convention relevant in practice; and how to report genocide when such coverage conflicts with state interests.

War Genocide and Justice

War  Genocide  and Justice
Author: Cathy J. Schlund-Vials
Release: 2012
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 243
ISBN: 081667096X
Language: en
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In the three years, eight months, and twenty days of the Khmer Rouge's deadly reign over Cambodia, an estimated 1.7 million Cambodians perished as a result of forced labor, execution, starvation, and disease. Despite the passage of more than thirty years, two regime shifts, and a contested U.N. intervention, only one former Khmer Rouge official has been successfully tried and sentenced for crimes against humanity in an international court of law to date. It is against this background of war, genocide, and denied justice that Cathy J. Schlund-Vials explores the work of 1.5-generation Cambodian American artists and writers. Drawing on what James Young labels “memory work”—the collected articulation of large-scale human loss—War, Genocide, and Justice investigates the remembrance work of Cambodian American cultural producers through film, memoir, and music. Schlund-Vials includes interviews with artists such as Anida Yoeu Ali, praCh Ly, Sambath Hy, and Socheata Poeuv. Alongside the enduring legacy of the Killing Fields and post-9/11 deportations of Cambodian American youth, artists potently reimagine alternative sites for memorialization, reclamation, and justice. Traversing borders, these artists generate forms of genocidal remembrance that combat amnesic politics and revise citizenship practices in the United States and Cambodia. Engaged in politicized acts of resistance, individually produced and communally consumed, Cambodian American memory work represents a significant and previously unexamined site of Asian American critique.

A A Problem From Hell

 A   A Problem From Hell
Author: Samantha Power
Release: 2013-05-14
Editor: Basic Books
Pages: 640
ISBN: 9780465050895
Language: en
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A character-driven study of some of the darkest moments in our national history, when America failed to prevent or stop 20th-century campaigns to exterminate Armenians, Jews, Cambodians, Iraqi Kurds, Bosnians, and Rwandans.

Our World in Crisis Civil War and Genocide

Our World in Crisis  Civil War and Genocide
Author: Izzi Howell
Release: 2021-11-09
Editor: Franklin Watts
Pages: 48
ISBN: 1445163713
Language: en
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Since the end of the Second World War in 1945, most wars have been civil wars. This book considers how civil wars start, how they are funded and fought and the catastrophic effects they have on the civilians living in the countries involved. It also looks at the atrocities described as genocides, the attempts to destroy an ethnic, religious, national or racial group. It asks readers to think about what they can do to help victims and their families, such as supporting charities who help people to find sustainable ways of living in the aftermath of a civil war.

Anatomy of a Genocide

Anatomy of a Genocide
Author: Omer Bartov
Release: 2018-01-23
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Pages: 416
ISBN: 9781451684551
Language: en
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“A substantive contribution to the history of ethnic strife and extreme violence” (The Wall Street Journal) and a cautionary examination of how genocide can take root at the local level—turning neighbors, friends, and family against one another—as seen through the eastern European border town of Buczacz during World War II. For more than four hundred years, the Eastern European border town of Buczacz—today part of Ukraine—was home to a highly diverse citizenry. It was here that Poles, Ukrainians, and Jews all lived side by side in relative harmony. Then came World War II, and three years later the entire Jewish population had been murdered by German and Ukrainian police, while Ukrainian nationalists eradicated Polish residents. In truth, though, this genocide didn’t happen so quickly. In Anatomy of a Genocide, Omer Bartov explains that ethnic cleansing doesn’t occur as is so often portrayed in popular history, with the quick ascent of a vitriolic political leader and the unleashing of military might. It begins in seeming peace, slowly and often unnoticed, the culmination of pent-up slights and grudges and indignities. The perpetrators aren’t just sociopathic soldiers. They are neighbors and friends and family. They are also middle-aged men who come from elsewhere, often with their wives and children and parents, and settle into a life of bourgeois comfort peppered with bouts of mass murder. For more than two decades Bartov, whose mother was raised in Buczacz, traveled extensively throughout the region, scouring archives and amassing thousands of documents rarely seen until now. He has also made use of hundreds of first-person testimonies by victims, perpetrators, collaborators, and rescuers. Anatomy of a Genocide profoundly changes our understanding of the social dynamics of mass killing and the nature of the Holocaust as a whole. Bartov’s book isn’t just an attempt to understand what happened in the past. It’s a warning of how it could happen again, in our own towns and cities—much more easily than we might think.

Africa s World War

Africa s World War
Author: Gerard Prunier
Release: 2008-12-31
Editor: Oxford University Press
Pages: 576
ISBN: 0199743991
Language: en
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The Rwandan genocide sparked a horrific bloodbath that swept across sub-Saharan Africa, ultimately leading to the deaths of some four million people. In this extraordinary history of the recent wars in Central Africa, Gerard Prunier offers a gripping account of how one grisly episode laid the groundwork for a sweeping and disastrous upheaval. Prunier vividly describes the grisly aftermath of the Rwandan genocide, when some two million refugees--a third of Rwanda's population--fled to exile in Zaire in 1996. The new Rwandan regime then crossed into Zaire and attacked the refugees, slaughtering upwards of 400,000 people. The Rwandan forces then turned on Zaire's despotic President Mobutu and, with the help of a number of allied African countries, overthrew him. But as Prunier shows, the collapse of the Mobutu regime and the ascension of the corrupt and erratic Laurent-D?sir? Kabila created a power vacuum that drew Rwanda, Uganda, Angola, Zimbabwe, Sudan, and other African nations into an extended and chaotic war. The heart of the book documents how the whole core of the African continent became engulfed in an intractible and bloody conflict after 1998, a devastating war that only wound down following the assassination of Kabila in 2001. Prunier not only captures all this in his riveting narrative, but he also indicts the international community for its utter lack of interest in what was then the largest conflict in the world. Praise for the hardcover: "The most ambitious of several remarkable new books that reexamine the extraordinary tragedy of Congo and Central Africa since the Rwandan genocide of 1994." --New York Review of Books "One of the first books to lay bare the complex dynamic between Rwanda and Congo that has been driving this disaster." --Jeffrey Gettleman, New York Times Book Review "Lucid, meticulously researched and incisive, Prunier's will likely become the standard account of this under-reported tragedy." --Publishers Weekly

Nazism War and Genocide

Nazism  War and Genocide
Author: Jeremy Noakes,Neil Gregor
Release: 2005
Editor: Liverpool University Press
Pages: 226
ISBN: UOM:39015063669777
Language: en
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Bringing together contributions by internationally recognized scholars from Britain, Germany and the USA, this volume provides an approach to the history of Nazism's racial policy, its social policy, its planning for war and genocide, and its legacy.