Wisdom Sits in Places

Wisdom Sits in Places
Author: Keith H. Basso
Release: 1996
Editor: UNM Press
Pages: 171
ISBN: 0826317243
Language: en
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Explores the connections of place, language, wisdom, and morality among the Western Apache.

Wisdom Sits in Places

Wisdom Sits in Places
Author: Keith H. Basso
Release: 1996-08-01
Editor: UNM Press
Pages: 192
ISBN: 9780826327055
Language: en
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This remarkable book introduces us to four unforgettable Apache people, each of whom offers a different take on the significance of places in their culture. Apache conceptions of wisdom, manners and morals, and of their own history are inextricably intertwined with place, and by allowing us to overhear his conversations with Apaches on these subjects Basso expands our awareness of what place can mean to people. Most of us use the term sense of place often and rather carelessly when we think of nature or home or literature. Our senses of place, however, come not only from our individual experiences but also from our cultures. Wisdom Sits in Places, the first sustained study of places and place-names by an anthropologist, explores place, places, and what they mean to a particular group of people, the Western Apache in Arizona. For more than thirty years, Keith Basso has been doing fieldwork among the Western Apache, and now he shares with us what he has learned of Apache place-names--where they come from and what they mean to Apaches. "This is indeed a brilliant exposition of landscape and language in the world of the Western Apache. But it is more than that. Keith Basso gives us to understand something about the sacred and indivisible nature of words and place. And this is a universal equation, a balance in the universe. Place may be the first of all concepts; it may be the oldest of all words."--N. Scott Momaday "In Wisdom Sits in Places Keith Basso lifts a veil on the most elemental poetry of human experience, which is the naming of the world. In so doing he invests his scholarship with that rarest of scholarly qualities: a sense of spiritual exploration. Through his clear eyes we glimpse the spirit of a remarkable people and their land, and when we look away, we see our own world afresh."--William deBuys "A very exciting book--authoritative, fully informed, extremely thoughtful, and also engagingly written and a joy to read. Guiding us vividly among the landscapes and related story-tellings of the Western Apache, Basso explores in a highly readable way the role of language in the complex but compelling theme of a people's attachment to place. An important book by an eminent scholar."--Alvin M. Josephy, Jr.

Wisdom Sits in Places

Wisdom Sits in Places
Author: Keith H. Basso
Release: 1996
Editor: Unknown
Pages: 171
ISBN: 0826317235
Language: en
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Explores the connections of place, language, wisdom, and morality among the Western Apache.

The Cibecue Apache

The Cibecue Apache
Author: Keith H. Basso
Release: 1986-02-01
Editor: Waveland Press
Pages: 106
ISBN: 9781478631033
Language: en
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Cultural anthropologist Keith H. Basso (1940–2013) was noted for his long-term research of the Western Apaches, specifically those from the modern community of Cibecue, Arizona, the site of his ethnographic and linguistic research for fifty-four years. One of his earliest works, The Cibecue Apache, has now been read by generations of students. It captures the true character of Apache culture not only because of its objective analyses and descriptions but also because of the author’s belief in allowing the people to speak for themselves. Basso learned their language, became a trusted friend and intimate, and returned to the field often to gather data, participate, and observe. Basso’s goal in this now-classic work is to describe Cibecue Apache perceptions, experiences, conflicts, and indecision. A primary aim is to depict portions of the Western Apache belief system, especially those dealing with the supernatural. Emphasis is also given to the girls’ puberty ceremony, its meaning and functions, as well as modern Apache economic and political life.

Portraits of the Whiteman

Portraits of  the Whiteman
Author: Keith H. Basso
Release: 1979-08-31
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Pages: 120
ISBN: 9781107392786
Language: en
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'The Whiteman' is one of the most powerful and pervasive symbols in contemporary American Indian cultures. Portraits of 'the Whiteman': linguistic play and cultural symbols among the Western Apache investigates a complex form of joking in which Apaches stage carefully crafted imitations of Anglo-Americans and, by means of these characterizations, give audible voice and visible substance to their conceptions of this most pressing of social 'problems'. Keith Basso's essay, based on linguistic and ethnographic materials collected in Cibecue, a Western Apache community, provides interpretations of selected joking encounters to demonstrate how Apaches go about making sense of the behaviour of Anglo-Americans. This study draws on theory in symbolic anthropology, sociolinguistics, and the dramaturgical model of human communication developed by Erving Goffman. Although the assumptions and premises that shape these areas of inquiry are held by some to be quite disparate, this analysis shows them to be fully compatible and mutually complementary.

An Introduction to Native North America Pearson eText

An Introduction to Native North America    Pearson eText
Author: Mark Q. Sutton
Release: 2015-08-26
Editor: Routledge
Pages: 432
ISBN: 9781317347200
Language: en
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An Introduction to Native North America provides a basic introduction to the native peoples of North America, including both the United States and Canada. It covers the history of research, basic prehistory, the European invasion and the impact of Europeans on Native cultures. Additionally, much of the book is written from the perspective of the ethnographic present, and the various cultures are described as they were at the specific times noted in the text. Teaching and Learning Experiences: Improve Critical Thinking - An Introduction to Native North America provides internet resources for students to supplement reading material, and contains an extensive bibliography to aid in their research. Engage Students - An Introduction to Native North America highlights important individuals in "VIP Profile" mini-biographies, and contains "Sidelights" throughout the text which provides short explanations of interesting aspects of native culture. Support Instructors - Teaching your course just got easier! You can create a Customized Text or use our Instructor's Manual, Electronic "MyTest" Test Bank or PowerPoint Presentation Slides. Plus, An Introduction to Native North America's organization was designed to be used in conjunction with the Handbook of North American Indians, published by the Smithsonian Institution.

Don t Let the Sun Step Over You

Don t Let the Sun Step Over You
Author: Eva Tulene Watt
Release: 2004
Editor: University of Arizona Press
Pages: 340
ISBN: 9780816523917
Language: en
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When the Apache wars ended in the late nineteenth century, a harsh and harrowing time began for the Western Apache people. Living under the authority of nervous Indian agents, pitiless government-school officials, and menacing mounted police, they knew that resistance to American authority would be foolish. But some Apache families did resist in the most basic way they could: they resolved to endure. Although Apache history has inspired numerous works by non-Indian authors, Apache people themselves have been reluctant to comment at length on their own past. Eva Tulene Watt, born in 1913, now shares the story of her family from the time of the Apache wars to the modern era. Her narrative presents a view of history that differs fundamentally from conventional approaches, which have almost nothing to say about the daily lives of Apache men and women, their values and social practices, and the singular abilities that enabled them to survive. In a voice that is spare, factual, and unflinchingly direct, Mrs. Watt reveals how the Western Apaches carried on in the face of poverty, hardship, and disease. Her interpretation of her peopleÕs past is a diverse assemblage of recounted events, biographical sketches, and cultural descriptions that bring to life a vanished time and the men and women who lived it to the fullest. We share her and her familyÕs travels and troubles. We learn how the Apache people struggled daily to find work, shelter, food, health, laughter, solace, and everything else that people in any community seek. Richly illustrated with more than 50 photographs, DonÕt Let the Sun Step Over You is a rare and remarkable book that affords a view of the past that few have seen beforeÑa wholly Apache view, unsettling yet uplifting, which weighs upon the mind and educates the heart.

Indigenous Peoples of North America

Indigenous Peoples of North America
Author: Robert James Muckle
Release: 2012
Editor: University of Toronto Press
Pages: 198
ISBN: 9781442603561
Language: en
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In this thoughtful book, Robert J. Muckle provides a brief, thematic overview of the key issues facing Indigenous peoples in North America from prehistory to the present.

Language Shift and Cultural Reproduction

Language Shift and Cultural Reproduction
Author: Don Kulick
Release: 1997-04-24
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Pages: 317
ISBN: 0521599261
Language: en
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This book, first published in 1992, is an anthropological study of language and cultural change among the people of Gapun, a small community in the Sepik region of Papua New Guinea.

Putting a Song on Top of it

Putting a Song on Top of it
Author: David William Samuels
Release: 2004
Editor: University of Arizona Press
Pages: 324
ISBN: 0816523797
Language: en
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As in many Native American communities, people on the San Carlos Apache reservation in southeastern Arizona have for centuries been exposed to contradictory pressures. One set of expectations is about conversion and modernizationÑspiritual, linguistic, cultural, technological. Another is about steadfast perseverance in the face of this cultural onslaught. Within this contradictory context lies the question of what validates a sense of Apache identity. For many people on the San Carlos reservation, both the traditional calls of the Mountain Spirits and the hard edge of a country, rock, or reggae song can evoke the feeling of being Apache. Using insights gained from both linguistic and musical practices in the communityÑas well as from his own experience playing in an Apache country bandÑDavid Samuels explores the complex expressive lives of these people to offer new ways of thinking about cultural identity. Samuels analyzes how people on the reservation make productive use of popular culture forms to create and transform contemporary expressions of Apache cultural identity. As Samuels learned, some popular songsÑsuch as those by Bob MarleyÑare reminiscent of history and bring about an alignment of past and present for the Apache listener. Thinking about Geronimo, for instance, might mean one thing, but "putting a song on top of it" results in a richer meaning. He also proposes that the concept of the pun, as both a cultural practice and a means of analysis, helps us understand the ways in which San Carlos Apaches are able to make cultural symbols point in multiple directions at once. Through these punning, layered expressions, people on the reservation express identities that resonate with the complicated social and political history of the Apache community. This richly detailed study challenges essentialist notions of Native American tribal and ethnic identity by revealing the turbulent complexity of everyday life on the reservation. Samuels's work is a multifaceted exploration of the complexities of sound, of language, and of the process of constructing and articulating identity in the twenty-first century.

Stranger in the Village of the Sick

Stranger in the Village of the Sick
Author: Paul Stoller
Release: 2005-04-15
Editor: Beacon Press
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780807072615
Language: en
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After more than fifty years of good health, anthropologist Paul Stoller suddenly found himself diagnosed with lymphoma. The only thing more transformative than his fear and dread of cancer was the place it ultimately took him: twenty-five years back in time to his days as an apprentice to a West African sorcerer, Adamu Jenitongo. Stranger in the Village of the Sick follows Stoller down this unexpected path toward personal discovery, growth, and healing. The stories here are about life in the village of the healthy and the village of the sick, and they highlight differences in how illness is culturally perceived. In America and the West, illness is war; we strive to eradicate it from our bodies and lives. In West Africa, however, illness is an ever-present companion, and sorcerers learn to master illnesses like cancer through a combination of acceptance, pragmatism, and patience. Stoller provides a view into the ancient practices of sorcery, revealing that as an apprentice he learned to read divining shells, mix potions, and recite incantations. But it wasn't until he got cancer that he realized that sorcery embodied a more profound meaning, one that every person could use: "Sorcery is a body of knowledge and practice that enables one to see things clearly and to walk with confidence on the path of fear."

Do Glaciers Listen

Do Glaciers Listen
Author: Julie Cruikshank
Release: 2010-10-01
Editor: UBC Press
Pages: 328
ISBN: 0774859768
Language: en
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Do Glaciers Listen? explores the conflicting depictions of glaciers to show how natural and cultural histories are objectively entangled in the Mount Saint Elias ranges. This rugged area, where Alaska, British Columbia, and the Yukon Territory now meet, underwent significant geophysical change in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, which coincided with dramatic social upheaval resulting from European exploration and increased travel and trade among Aboriginal peoples. European visitors brought with them varying conceptions of nature as sublime, as spiritual, or as a resource for human progress. They saw glaciers as inanimate, subject to empirical investigation and measurement. Aboriginal oral histories, conversely, described glaciers as sentient, animate, and quick to respond to human behaviour. In each case, however, the experiences and ideas surrounding glaciers were incorporated into interpretations of social relations. Focusing on these contrasting views during the late stages of the Little Ice Age (1550-1900), Cruikshank demonstrates how local knowledge is produced, rather than discovered, through colonial encounters, and how it often conjoins social and biophysical processes. She then traces how the divergent views weave through contemporary debates about cultural meanings as well as current discussions about protected areas, parks, and the new World Heritage site. Readers interested in anthropology and Native and northern studies will find this a fascinating read and a rich addition to circumpolar literature.

The Aztec Kings

The Aztec Kings
Author: Susan D. Gillespie
Release: 2016-10-11
Editor: Century Collection
Pages: 272
ISBN: 0816534780
Language: en
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Scholars have long viewed histories of the Aztecs either as flawed chronologies plagued by internal inconsistencies and intersource discrepancies or as legends that indiscriminately mingle reality with the supernatural. But this new work draws fresh conclusions from these documents, proposing that Aztec dynastic history was recast by its sixteenth-century recorders not merely to glorify ancestors but to make sense out of the trauma of conquest and colonialism. The Aztec Kings is the first major study to take into account the Aztec cyclical conception of time--which required that history constantly be reinterpreted to achieve continuity between past and present--and to treat indigenous historical traditions as symbolic statements in narrative form. Susan Gillespie focuses on the dynastic history of the Mexica of Tenochtitlan, whose stories reveal how the Aztecs used "history" to construct, elaborate, and reify ideas about the nature of rulership and the cyclical nature of the cosmos, and how they projected the Spanish conquest deep into the Aztec past in order to make history accommodate that event. By demonstrating that most of Aztec history is nonliteral, she sheds new light on Aztec culture and on the function of history in society. By relating the cyclical structure of Aztec dynastic history to similar traditions of African and Polynesian peoples, she introduces a broader perspective on the function of history in society and on how and why history must change.

Western Apache Language and Culture

Western Apache Language and Culture
Author: Keith H. Basso
Release: 1992-07-01
Editor: University of Arizona Press
Pages: 195
ISBN: 0816513236
Language: en
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Examines the importance of symbol in the Western Apache language, explaining how such elements as place names, metaphor, and the use of silence define Apache culture.

Language Culture and Society

Language  Culture  and Society
Author: Zdenek Salzmann,James Stanlaw,Nobuko Adachi
Release: 2014-07-08
Editor: Westview Press
Pages: 450
ISBN: 9780813349558
Language: en
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Why should we study language? How do the ways in which we communicate define our identities? And how is this all changing in the digital world? Since 1993, many have turned to Language, Culture, and Society for answers to questions like those above because of its comprehensive coverage of all critical aspects of linguistic anthropology. This seventh edition carries on the legacy while addressing some of the newer pressing and exciting challenges of the 21st century, such as issues of language and power, language ideology, and linguistic diasporas. Chapters on gender, race, and class also examine how language helps create-and is created by-identity. New to this edition are enhanced and updated pedagogical features, such as learning objectives, updated resources for continued learning, and the inclusion of a glossary. There is also an expanded discussion of communication online and of social media outlets and how that universe is changing how we interact. The discussion on race and ethnicity has also been expanded to include Latin- and Asian-American English vernacular.

White Kids

White Kids
Author: Mary Bucholtz
Release: 2010-12-23
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9781139495097
Language: en
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In White Kids, Mary Bucholtz investigates how white teenagers use language to display identities based on race and youth culture. Focusing on three youth styles - preppies, hip hop fans, and nerds - Bucholtz shows how white youth use a wealth of linguistic resources, from social labels to slang, from Valley Girl speech to African American English, to position themselves in the school's racialized social order. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in a multiracial urban California high school, the book also demonstrates how European American teenagers talk about race when discussing interracial friendship and difference, narrating racialized fear and conflict, and negotiating their own ethnoracial classification. The first book to use techniques of linguistic analysis to examine the construction of diverse white identities, it will be welcomed by researchers and students in linguistics, anthropology, ethnic studies and education.

Kensington Market

Kensington Market
Author: Na Li
Release: 2015-05-27
Editor: University of Toronto Press
Pages: 144
ISBN: 9781442616387
Language: en
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Since the beginning of the twentieth century, Toronto’s Kensington Market neighbourhood has been home to a multicultural mosaic of immigrant communities: Jewish, Portuguese, Chinese, South Asian, Caribbean, and many others. Despite repeated transformations, the neighbourhood has never lost its vibrant, close-knit character. In Kensington Market, urban planner and public historian Na Li explores both the Market’s dynamic history and the ways in which planners can access the intangible collective memory that helps define neighbourhoods like it around the world. Through examinations of memorable Kensington landmarks such as the Kiev Synagogue, Hyman’s Bookstore, and United Bakers Dairy Restaurant, Li traces the connections between the Market’s built environment and the experiences of its inhabitants, providing a sterling example of how to map the intangible value of this national landmark. Li’s book will be a must-read for those fascinated with this iconic Toronto neighbourhood, as well as anyone with an interest in the role heritage and collective memory can play in urban planning.

Western Apache Witchcraft

Western Apache Witchcraft
Author: Keith H. Basso
Release: 1969-05
Editor: University of Arizona Press
Pages: 75
ISBN: 0816501424
Language: en
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An ethnographic contribution describing the beliefs and ideas associated with witchcraft as shared "knowledge" that the Apaches have about their universe. Uncovers the types of interpersonal relationships with which witchcraft accusations are regularly associated and posits explanations for these associations.

Life Lived Like a Story

Life Lived Like a Story
Author: Julie Cruikshank
Release: 1992
Editor: UBC Press
Pages: 428
ISBN: 0774804130
Language: en
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The life stories of three remarkable and gifted women of Athapaskan and Tlingit ancestry who were born in the southern Yukon Territory around the turn of the century - when storytelling provides a customary framework for discussing the past.

Center Places and Cherokee Towns

Center Places and Cherokee Towns
Author: Christopher B. Rodning
Release: 2015-08-15
Editor: University of Alabama Press
Pages: 257
ISBN: 9780817318413
Language: en
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Center Places and Cherokee Towns examines the ways architecture and other aspects of the built environment, such as hearths, burials, and earthen mounds and embankments, formed center places within the Cherokee cultural landscape of the southern Appalachians from the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries.